Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

With Work Requirement, Indiana’s Medicaid Would Be More Expensive And Cover Fewer People

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

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Understanding The History Behind Communities' Vaccine Fears

May 5, 2017

All four of Anab Gulaid's children have received their vaccinations on the recommended schedule. As Somali-American residents of Minneapolis, that puts them in the minority.

Fewer than half of Minnesota children of Somali descent have received the MMR shot that protects against measles, mumps and rubella, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Health, which is now working to combat a growing measles outbreak in the Twin Cities.

Indiana has submitted new information to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on its Medicaid expansion program, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0. 

Katherine Peraza poses with her her 3-month-old son. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
(Jill Sheridan/IPB News)

From ages 7 to 18, Katherine Peraza was a ward of the state, living with a foster family in Indianapolis for most of that time. At 19, she became pregnant. When she went to the doctor, she was hit with a surprise.  

U.S. House of Representatives / house.gov

More than 400 mental health and addiction treatment organizations across the country have spoken up against the most recent version of the revised Republican healthcare bill, which cleared the U.S. House Thursday afternoon.  

Clock Is Ticking On GOP Bill: 5 Ways Health Care Tug-Of-War May Play Out

May 4, 2017
Architect of the Capitol / https://www.aoc.gov/capitol-buildings/national-statuary-hall

The House may pass its bill to repeal and replace parts of the Affordable Care Act. But Republicans’ pathway to fulfilling their seven-year effort to undo the federal health law is getting narrower by the day.

Bram Sable-Smith / Side Effects/KBIA

When 2-year-old Ryan Lennon Fines was born on Christmas day 2014, his mouth wasn’t connected to his stomach, a condition known as esophageal atresia. After three months in a NICU in St. Louis the family flew to Boston, where Ryan had surgery.

Ed Murray / http://murray.seattle.gov

Fueled by research conducted on such sites in other countries, the Massachusetts Medical Society's delegates voted to support studying a pilot program creating  a so-called "supervised injection facility," or SIF, in the commonwealth. 

Safe injection sites are designated areas where drug users can shoot up drugs under supervision of medical professionals, who can then intervene in the case of an overdose. They also provide clean needles and other supplies. If an SIF came to Boston, it would be the first safe injection space in the country. 

Trump’s Vow To Squeeze ‘Sanctuary Cities’ Could Play Havoc With Health Programs

May 2, 2017
Pixabay

 

The Trump administration’s tough stance on immigration has some local health department officials worried it could spur cuts in federal funding and complicate a wide variety of programs, from efforts to battle the opioid epidemic to domestic violence initiatives.

President Trump Promotes Revised Version Of GOP Health Care Bill

May 2, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For decades, black Americans have been dying at a higher rate than white Americans.

That's still true overall. But now there's some good news about this long, disturbing trend: The overall death rate for black Americans fell 25 percent between 1999 and 2015, according to a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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