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Are Nurse Practitioners the Solution to Indiana’s Physician Shortage?

More nurse practitioners are stepping up to meet the needs of Hoosier patients as Indiana grapples with a shortage of primary care doctors.

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On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

The opioid addiction crisis is often reported on in desperate terms. But, to the people working on the frontlines of the problem, there are known and proven approaches that can help.

Judge Halts Indiana's Latest Anti-Abortion Law

Jun 30, 2018
Lauren Chapman/IPB News

A federal judge says Indiana’s latest anti-abortion law is likely too vague to enforce.

The judge Thursday temporarily halted the state’s new abortion complication reporting law from taking effect.

Judge Blocks Kentucky Medicaid Work Requirement

Jun 29, 2018
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A federal judge on Friday struck down a Trump administration decision allowing states to force low-income adults to work to qualify for Medicaid.

The 60-page ruling, which is likely to be appealed, was hailed by advocates for the poor. But it could limit the number of states expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

Photo by Wes Hicks on Unsplash

A new program to help women who are addicted to opioids and their newborn babies will launch in Indianapolis and aims to fill a gap in treatment services.

The Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation is granting more than $840,000 to address the problem. President and CEO Claire Fiddian-Green says Care Plus is patient-focused.

"Really at its core it’s going to take the patient’s viewpoint about the best way to connect them to services," says Fiddian-Green. 

Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy / U.S. Air Force

Kentucky has one of the worst outbreaks of Hepatitis A in the country, and the liver disease has spread to several other Midwest states including Ohio, Tennessee and Indiana.

 


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The manufacturer of a drug linked to Indiana's 2015 HIV outbreak spent more than $200,000 in 2016 promoting its opioid-based pain medication to doctors.

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A new report found that more than 3,700 pregnant women and new mothers were hospitalized in Missouri for opioid abuse in the past two years.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Missouri Hospital Association research indicates that the number of babies born suffering withdrawal symptoms could be underreported. State data has identified more than 1,080 newborns diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome during 2016 and 2017.

Babies with the syndrome are more likely to be small and have respiratory issues, feeding problems, jaundice and seizures.

FPS GRONINGEN / FLICKR

Bob Jones of Trumbull County, Ohio, has recurring pain from an old injury, but he isn’t going to be getting opioids. He never wanted them anyway, and found his own solution for pain relief. 

That includes visits with chiropractor Patrick Ensminger.

“All I do is take the joint to its normal end range, which is about there,” Ensminger tells Jones. “And I apply a little additional push. And you felt a little bit of a pop or click there. And then we do the same procedure on the other side.”

“That felt good,” Jones responds. “And no medication. That’s a good thing.”

FDA Repays Industry by Rushing Risky Drugs to Market

Jun 27, 2018
Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Nuplazid, a drug for hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson’s disease, failed two clinical trials. In a third trial, under a revised standard for measuring its effect, it showed minimal benefit. Overall, more patients died or had serious side effects on Nuplazid than after receiving no treatment

Patients on Uloric, a gout drug, suffered more heart attacks, strokes and heart failure in two out of three trials than did their counterparts on standard or no medication.

Unlocked And Loaded: Families Confront Dementia And Guns

Jun 26, 2018
(HEIDI DE MARCO/KHN)

With a bullet in her gut, her voice choked with pain, Dee Hill pleaded with the 911 dispatcher for help.

“My husband accidentally shot me,” Hill, 75, of The Dalles, Ore., groaned on the May 16, 2015, call. “In the stomach, and he can’t talk, please …”

Less than four feet away, Hill’s husband, Darrell Hill, a former local police chief and two-term county sheriff, sat in his wheelchair with a discharged Glock handgun on the table in front of him, unaware that he’d nearly killed his wife of almost 57 years.

Creative Commons/Pixabay

Researchers have known for decades programs that provide clean syringes to injection drug users lower transmission rates of diseases like HIV and hepatitis C.

Now, they have personal stories to back the numbers.

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What's Your Health care Workaround Story?

What's Your Health care Workaround Story?

What is the craziest thing you've had to do to get the health care you need? We're launching a new podcast called "The Workaround", and we're looking for your stories!

Side Effects, Indiana

Public health news focused on Indiana

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