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Are Nurse Practitioners the Solution to Indiana’s Physician Shortage?

More nurse practitioners are stepping up to meet the needs of Hoosier patients as Indiana grapples with a shortage of primary care doctors.

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On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

The opioid addiction crisis is often reported on in desperate terms. But, to the people working on the frontlines of the problem, there are known and proven approaches that can help.

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Across the country, states desperate to prevent opioid addiction are increasingly looking to medical cannabis as a solution. Lawmakers in several states, including New York, Indiana, Georgia and Tennessee, have taken action to initiate or expand their medical marijuana programs to try and address the opioid crisis.

Illinois is trying to do the same.

Side Effects Public Media reporter Jake Harper was recognized by the National Institute for Health Care Management for his reporting on how a drugmaker pushed lawmakers and courts to take steps that would increase the use of one of the company's drugs. This meant alternative medications were restricted. 

At the 24th annual NIHCM Research and Journalism Awards on June 5, Harper received honorable mention for the investigative reporting he did with NPR last year.  You can listen to Harper's stories below. 

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Hoosiers did not stop signing up for Indiana's Medicaid expansion even though they had to pay into a health savings account. That’s according to new research from three Indiana University professors.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends states spend more than $73 million annually on tobacco cessation and prevention efforts. A new report finds Indiana spends just more than 10 percent of that amount, less than half the national average.

The state spent just more than $8 million in federal and state funds in 2016 to help people quit smoking or prevent them from starting.

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Doctor Emily Meier usually practices hematology at the Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center in Indianapolis. But four times a year Meier and her team drive two hours north to Lake County, Indiana and host a clinic for children diagnosed with sickle cell disease.


National Judicial Drug Task Force Meets In Indy

Jun 5, 2018
Brandon Smith/IPB News

Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush says judicial leaders from around the country feel a sense of urgency as they develop an infrastructure for court systems to address the nation’s opioid crisis.

Chief Justice Loretta Rush is the co-chair of the National Judicial Opioid Task Force, which formed last year. It met for the third time this week in Indianapolis.

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A new state program will deliver medically tailored meals to these people. The Ryan’s Meals for Life project is funded by a $1 million grant from the Indiana State Department of Health.

Meals on Wheels of Central Indiana project manager Nick Fennig says the meals program aims to reach more than 2,500 people in Indiana.

"As far as we know, it’s the first statewide pilot of its kind in the country to serve medically-tailored meals to persons living with HIV across the state," says Fennig.

Naloxone Manufacturer Issues Recall

Jun 5, 2018
Lauren Chapman/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Naloxone manufacturer Hospira issued a voluntary recall of its single-use cartridge syringe system for the opioid overdose antidote.

The company says it found loose or embedded particulate matter on the syringe plunger. The recall is on lot numbers 7260LL and 76510LL.

If someone is exposed to the particulate, Hospira says there is a low chance of experiencing adverse health effects including allergic reactions and pulmonary dysfunction.

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Indianapolis health researchers hope the results of a new study will encourage policymakers to support nationwide Medicaid expansion.

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DeVonte Jones began to show signs of schizophrenia as a teenager. His first public episode was nine years ago at a ball game at Wavering Park in Quincy, Illinois.

“He snapped out and just went around and started kicking people,” said Jones’ mother Linda Colon, who now lives in Midlothian in the Chicago suburbs.


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What's Your Health care Workaround Story?

What's Your Health care Workaround Story?

What is the craziest thing you've had to do to get the health care you need? We're launching a new podcast called "The Workaround", and we're looking for your stories!

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