Jake Harper

Reporter, WFYI

Jake is a reporter with Side Effects and WFYI in Indianapolis. He decided to pursue radio journalism while volunteering at a community station in Madison, WI, and soon after began an internship with NPR's State of the Re:Union. Jake has received a first place award from the Milwaukee Press Club and he was a finalist in KCRW's 24-Hour Radio Race. In his spare time, he runs and tries to perfect his pizza crust recipe. 

Ways to Connect

CDC/ Debora Cartagena

Every month, Cynthia Edwards breathes through a machine that can tell if she’s been smoking. If the machine registers a low enough number, she takes home a $25 voucher to help her pay for diapers for her five-month old son, Justus.


Jake Harper/WFYI

 

A single X-ray or CT scan exposes a person to just a tiny bit of radiation, but over time, that exposure can add up to increased rates of cancer -- especially for kids. Now, patients at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis have a new option.

It looks sort of like a futuristic shower, but it's not. It's an X-ray system known as EOS. The machine can take two X-rays at once and construct a 3-D image, but the best part is that it uses much less radiation than traditional scans.

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