Sarah Fentem

Reporter and Digital Producer, Side Effects

A native midwesterner, Sarah Fentem has been a radio reporter in Indiana for years, first at WFIU in Bloomington and later at WBAA in West Lafayette, where she covered health policy for the state's regional journalism collaborative. She specializes in reporting on the wonkier bits of health care: federal legislative changes, pharmaceutical prices and the individual health insurance market.

 

In addition to being a reporter, Sarah works as Side Effects' digital producer, editing stories for web, maintaining the website and social media feeds and managing other bits of the newsroom's daily grind.

Ways to Connect

Aric Hartvig / WFYI

Syringe exchanges are a controversial concept. Even when they're successful at containing disease, they can be difficult to sell to the public. In Madison County, Indiana, residents' ethical concerns shut down a program, which was put in place to curb rates of hepatitis C.

Rock And Enroll: Open Enrollment Questions, Answered

Nov 1, 2017
healthcare.gov

Nov. 1 marks the first day of 2018 open enrollment, the period in which people can sign up for insurance through healthcare.gov. The Affordable Care Act has been through the legislative wringer this year, and there are plenty of changes this period for people buying insurance on the marketplace. WFIU’s Becca Costello and Side Effects’ Sarah Fentem answer some open enrollment questions — with the help of some policy experts.

Sarah Fentem / Side Effects Public Media

Open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act exchange starts this week. But customers shopping for 2018 plans may not get as much help as they have in previous years.


The White House announced late Thursday night the federal government will no longer provide cost sharing reductions for Affordable Care Act insurance plans. Indiana insurers — at least the two still left on the exchange — had been bracing for the news.


cgpgrey.com

The GOP’s latest Obamacare overhaul proposal could significantly reduce funding for state Medicaid programs and turn expansion plans — including Indiana’s HIP 2.0 — on their heads.


Jill Sheridan / Indiana Public Broadcasting

More than half a million Hoosiers have been diagnosed with diabetes, and many of them rely on insulin to live healthy lives. But patients say the skyrocketing price of the medicine —which more than doubled from 2002 to 2013 — is squeezing them to the point of outrage.

ChiLam Ly / https://www.flickr.com/photos/28391140@N03/

The federal government has awarded the state a record-breaking $26 million to help treat patients with HIV. The Indiana State Department of Health says it’s the largest award for HIV services in the state’s history.


Cultural, Economic, Historical Factors Drive Black Breast-Feeding Gap

Sep 7, 2017
Sarah Fentem / Side Effects Public Media

Tahwii Spicer gave birth to her son Reece almost two years ago at home with the help of a midwife. She said almost as soon as he was born, he "army-crawled" up her body to start feeding.

“He was so ravenous!” she said. “He was hungry.


Wikimedia Commons

One of the first Indiana counties to implement a syringe exchange is now the first in the state to effectively shut its program down.

Gretchen Frazee / WTIU News

Surgeon General Nominee Jerome Adams’ confirmation hearing before a Senate panel Tuesday was a mostly collegial meeting, with the Indiana State Health Commissioner receiving praise from several members of the bipartisan panel.


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