addiction and drug use

Two summers ago, we met a woman who went by the name Teacup.

"I'm an active heroin user," she told us. "Thirty-three years as a matter of fact."

Jake Harper / Side Effects Public Media

Philip Kirby says he first used heroin during a stint in a halfway house a few years ago, when he was 21 years old. He quickly formed a habit.

"You can't really dabble in it," he says.

  

Esparta Palmer

Every other week Cassidy Linnemeier carpools with a friend to their OB-GYN in Indianapolis from Seymour Indiana, where they live. The drive is about an hour and 20 minutes with traffic.

They drive this far because they can’t find a doctor nearby who will prescribe the addiction medicine they need to keep them healthy during pregnancy — and who also takes their insurance, a Medicaid plan.


Ashley Gardner / Shaw Air Force Base

Well-paying manufacturing and industrial jobs—the same kinds of jobs that were promised to American workers in the last election cycle—are sitting unfilled, thanks to applicants' inability to pass employer-required drug tests, according to a report in the New York Times

Emily Forman / Side Effects Public Media

Nurse Catherine “Bizz” Grimes moves like her name sounds: at a frenetic pace. She darts across the hall from the prenatal diagnosis clinic at Indiana University Health University Hospital in Indianapolis, sits down at her cubicle, puts on her headset over curly white blonde hair and starts dialing.

A new study shows some people are still afraid to call 911 when helping an overdose victim, despite an Indiana law that permits friends and bystanders to administer the overdose antidote naloxone.

More than a quarter of people surveyed by two researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis said they didn’t call 911 at the scene of an overdose for fear of arrest.

Wiki Commons

In June, Middletown, Ohio, council member Dan Picard suggested that every time an ambulance responds to a drug overdose, the receiving patient be required to pay for the cost by performing community service. If that person experiences more than two overdoses but have not completed their community service, the 911 dispatcher will not send an ambulance.

UPDATE: County Reverses No-Naloxone Policy After Supply Restocked

Jul 13, 2017
School nurses learn to use naloxone
Michelle Faust/Side Effects

The Monroe County, Indiana Sheriff’s Department says it will continue to administer the overdose antidote Naloxone when responding to emergency calls after receiving an additional 100 doses from the county health department.

New On The Streets: Drug For Nerve Pain Boosts High For Opioid Abusers

Jul 12, 2017
Carmen Heredia Rodriguez / Kaiser Health News

On April 5, Ciera Smith sat in a car parked on the gravel driveway of the Rural Women’s Recovery Program here with a choice to make: go to jail or enter treatment for her addiction.

Support Wanes As Indiana County Officials Stall On Syringe Exchange

Jul 11, 2017
OZ in OH / http://bit.ly/2tG9mHo

Tippecanoe County, Indiana received state approval for a syringe exchange in late 2016, after county health officials raised the alarm about fast-rising rates of Hepatitis C, spread by sharing needles for injection drugs. As of July 2017, it has yet to open its doors.

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