criminal justice

AJ Casey / AJKC LLC

One day in August 2016, 83-year-old Albert Fink crashed his 2012 BMW sedan into a tree, on a curve on Indiana State Road 46 just outside of Bloomington.

More people who are addicted to opioids are coming into the Marion County Jail, according to the sheriff’s office. The influx has the sheriff calling on Indiana lawmakers to spend more to combat addiction.   

Lieutenant Colonel James Martin, the Marion County Jail commander, says the facility has seen an influx of people going into withdrawals. “The majority of the problems we are dealing with are your first 20 or so hours in custody,” says Martin.

Office of the Attorney General for Elkhart County

In Indiana, seven federal criminal investigations have uncovered over $1 million in Medicaid fraud, leading to the indictment of 15 individuals and two companies on various charges.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Terrell Harris spent two years in prison on a drug charge when his son was a toddler.

Now, he worries about the effects of that absence.

“I’ve noticed a change in my son because of me not being there and being incarcerated,” Harris says.

Mental Health Courts Are Popular But Effectiveness Is Still Unproven

Dec 28, 2015
Eric E. Johnson via Flickr

Mental health courts are popular in many communities, and it’s easy to understand why. Rather than sending someone who’s mentally ill to an overcrowded jail that is poorly equipped to manage his condition, mental health courts offer treatment and help with housing and other social services. The community saves on the cost of locking someone up and offenders get support to stay healthy and may have their charges expunged. Everybody wins, right?

This story was originally produced by Kaiser Health News

Prisons And Jails Forcing Inmates To Cover Some Medical Care Costs

Sep 29, 2015
tOrange.us

Correctional facilities are responsible for providing health services to people who are jailed, but that doesn’t mean that prisoners don’t face financial charges for care. In most states they may be on the hook for copayments ranging from a few dollars to as much as $100 for medical care, according to a recent study.

Elvert Barnes/Flickr

States with higher rates of gun ownership are more dangerous to police officers, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Despite their training and protective gear, law enforcement officers still get killed, mostly with guns. The authors of the study found that gun ownership in a given state seems to be an important risk factor: States with high rates of gun ownership had three times the rate of officer homicides than low-gun states.  

Criminal justice systems are bearing the brunt of increasing cuts to a psychiatric system that has been slashed since the 1960s. That’s the contention of police and sheriffs who encounter the mentally ill on runs and in jails on a daily basis. The National Alliance on Mental Illness estimates that between 25 and 40 percent of mentally ill Americans will be jailed at some point in their lives.