E-cigarettes

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The Food and Drug Administration announced Tuesday they will take steps to crack down on the sale of e-cigarette products to children and teenagers. More than two million middle and high school students used e-cigarettes in 2016 and that number has continued to grow.

FDA Acts To Regulate E-Cigarettes And Cigars For The First Time

May 5, 2016

The Food and Drug Administration is banning the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors as part of a broad set of regulations the agency finalized Wednesday.

With the rules that were more than two years in the making, the agency is expanding its authority over e-cigarettes, cigars and hookah tobacco, in much the same way it already regulates traditional cigarettes.

Study: E-Cigs, Hookah Popular Among Middle and High School Students

Apr 28, 2016
Lindsay Fox via Flickr

E-cigarettes and smoking hookah have gained popularity among middle and high school students in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The number of middle and high school students using e-cigarettes tripled from 2013 to 2014.

Among high school students, 13.4 percent were found to be using e-cigarettes in 2014 compared with 4.5 percent in 2013. The number of middle school students using e-cigarettes also tripled from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014.

Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

Oct 28, 2015

It's become an emotional debate: Do e-cigarettes help people get off regular cigarettes or are they a new avenue for addiction?

Until now, there has been little solid evidence to back up either side. But a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could help fill that void.

Vaping360.com/Flickr

Lower Is Better: Results of A Blood Pressure Study Could Save Lives 

Findings were so strong that researchers ended the study a year early, as The Washington Post reports

Vaping360.com/Flickr

E-cigarettes may set young people on the path to smoking regular cigarettes, according to a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics.


Vapor produced by electronic cigarettes can contain a surprisingly high concentration of formaldehyde — a known carcinogen — researchers reported Wednesday.

The findings, described in a letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine, intensify concern about the safety of electronic cigarettes, which have become increasingly popular.

A new study finds that that e-cigarettes contain more cancer-causing agents than traditional cigarettes. One brand tested contained as much as 10 times more.

The carcinogens include chemicals such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, found in several forms of e-cigarette liquid.

The study, commissioned by Japan’s Health Ministry, is the latest blow to the fast-growing industry that markets itself as a safer alternative to satisfying nicotine cravings, by using vaporized liquids instead of smoke.

Tobacco control advocates disagree on whether e-cigarettes are a useful tool to get smokers off tobacco, or just a sleeker form of one of the world's deadliest addictions.

A lot of that discord comes from the fact that there's just not enough science to know the risks and benefits of e-cigarettes, which deliver nicotine in a vapor rather than through tobacco smoke. And it could take years to find out if vaping causes cancer and other deadly diseases.