Exercise

Creative Commons/Pixabay

New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds only 15 percent of Hoosiers get the recommended amount of weekly physical activity. 

The guidelines were established in 2008 and include weekly aerobic activity and muscle strengthening exercise. The CDC data from 2010-2015 ranks Hoosiers 47th nationwide for meeting the recommendations.

Only 10 percent of Indiana’s women meet the levels.

Jake Harper/Side Effects

On a hot day, some adults have taken a group of kids to explore the neighborhood around their school, SENSE — the Southeast Neighborhood School of Excellence, a K-8 charter school in Indianapolis. They’ve left the school’s air-conditioned cafeteria to perform a walk audit.


Practicing And Teaching Yoga In Rural America

Aug 18, 2016
ngk/via flickr

Jenny Gore works full time as a police dispatcher. Her shifts are long-- sometimes twelve hours--and she’s often on the road. It’s a hectic schedule, and there’s no shortage of stress in her life. Still, she tries to make room for yoga. In fact, she’s surprised at how important yoga has become to her.


The majority of patients with depression have problems with sleep, usually insomnia. But about 10 to 12 percent have the opposite problem.

KERA News spoke with Dr. Madhukar Trivedi, Director of University of Texas Southwestern’s Center for Depression Research and Clinical Care about hypersomnia and how aerobic exercise may alleviate the problem.


The "World of Coca-Cola" museum in Atlanta, Georgia
By Rundvald via Wikimedia Commons

Coca-Cola is providing financial support to a group of scientists who promote the argument that Americans are overly concerned with nutrition, while they should be exercising more. The new nonprofit Global Energy Balance Network is funded by an unlimited gift from Coca-Cola, as well as gifts from universities where some of its member scientists are employed and private philanthropy, according to the organization's website.  

A Look At Sports And Health In America

Jun 15, 2015

Play ball! Fore! Swish!

Americans love sports — watching them and playing them.

But as participants, Americans' relationship with sports changes as we grow older. About three-quarters of adults say they played sports when they were younger. By the time people are in their late 20s, however, only 26 percent say they've played sports in the past year.

Those are just two of the findings from the latest poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health that takes a look at sports and health in America.

Are you a pen-clicker? A hair-twirler? A knee-bouncer? Did you ever get in trouble for fidgeting in class? Don't hang your head in shame. All that movement may be helping you think.

Walking 2 Minutes An Hour Boosts Health, But It's No Panacea

May 1, 2015

We know that sitting all day is hazardous to our health, increasing the risk of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, inflammation and atherosclerosis. It all sounds pretty dismal, since many of today's jobs require us to be nearly glued to our computer screens. But a tiny two-minute break may help offset that hazard, researchers say.

People who got up and moved around for at least two minutes every hour had a 33 percent lower risk of dying, according to researchers the University Of Utah School Of Medicine.

Will Smart Clothing Amp Up Your Workout?

Apr 3, 2015

When Eric Blue goes to the gym, he sports a wafer-thin shirt that tracks his every move.

Blue's shirt contains tiny sensors woven into the fabric. They monitor his heart rate, the calories he burns and other metrics, like breathing rate. A companion app on his smartphone informs him about the intensity of his workouts.

Blue, a Los Angeles entrepreneur, says regular use of the shirt has pushed him to "up his game" during exercise.

The human armpit has a lot to offer bacteria. It's moist, it's warm, and it's usually dark.

But when the bacteria show up, they can make a stink. That's because when some kinds of bacteria encounter sweat they produce smelly compounds, transforming the armpit from a neutral oasis to the mothership of body odor. And one group of bacteria is to blame for the stink, researchers say.

Pages