gun violence

When U.S. officials feared an outbreak of the Zika virus last year, the Department of Health and Human Services and state officials kicked into high gear.

They tested mosquitoes neighborhood by neighborhood in Miami and other hot Gulf Coast communities where the virus was likely to flourish. They launched outreach campaigns to encourage people to use bug spray. And they pushed the development of a vaccine.

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Homicides, mainly gun deaths, are the biggest contributor to premature death among black Americans.  Yet despite this harsh statistic, there’s very little research on the issue, according to a new study from Indiana University’s School of Public Health in Bloomington.

Victims Of Gun Violence Pay A Lifelong Price

Aug 28, 2017
Durrie Bouscaren / Saint Louis Public Radio

In 2011, Aaron Murray bought his first gun at a sporting goods store — a .40-caliber Beretta pistol. He and his wife were fixing up a foreclosed home in a tough neighborhood in the northern suburbs of St. Louis, and he wanted to protect himself.


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If you’re like millions of other Americans, when a big event happens –a  shooting, a disease outbreak, a contentious election –you scour the internet to make sense of what’s going on.

Every year in the U.S., more than 30,000 people die from things related to guns.

That puts guns ahead of HIV, Parkinson's disease, malnutrition, hypertension, intestinal infection, peptic ulcer, anemia, viral hepatitis, biliary tract disease, atherosclerosis and fires. Yet, the funding for research on gun violence lags far behind other leading causes of death, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

It's ladies night at the Centennial Gun Club in a suburb of Denver. More than 80 women are here for safety instruction and target practice.

When a young African-American man dies in the city of Philadelphia, more than half the time there's one main reason why, says Scott Charles.

"It's because somebody pointed a gun at him and pulled that trigger. It's not because of cancer; it's not because of car accidents; it's not because of house fires. It's because somebody pointed a trigger," he says.

For This Man, Reducing Gun Violence Is A Life’s Mission

Jul 5, 2016

As the ancient Chinese proverb says, from crisis comes opportunity. That is certainly true for Garen Wintemute, a leading gun-violence researcher and emergency room doctor who finds “teaching moments” in the grief-filled days and weeks following mass shootings in America.

He is using a window of opportunity recently opened by the mass shooting in Orlando, Fla., to bring attention to the issue.

Jake Harper/Side Effects

On a recent hot day in Indianapolis, Keith Smitherman made a stop at an apartment complex in one of that city's most violent neighborhoods, near 38th Street and Sherman Avenue. He was there to deliver food vouchers to a young, pregnant mom, and he got invited to the baby shower.


Gun Violence 'A Public Health Crisis,' American Medical Association Says

Jun 15, 2016

Days after the deadly mass shooting in Orlando, Fla., the American Medical Association says it is adopting a policy calling gun violence in the U.S. "a public health crisis," and it says it will actively lobby Congress to overturn 20-year-old legislation blocking research on gun violence by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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