health inequities

When Arline Geronimus was a student at Princeton University in the late 1970s, she worked a part-time job at a school for pregnant teenagers in Trenton, N.J. She quickly noticed that the teenagers at that part-time job were suffering from chronic health conditions that her whiter, better-off Princeton classmates rarely experienced. Geronimus began to wonder: how much of the health problems that the young mothers in Trenton experienced were caused by the stresses of their environment?

AJ Mast for Side Effects Public Media

When Ronson Rowley was a teen, he said he used to sneak into a nightclub called the Ten Bar. “It was the only black gay club here in Indianapolis,” he recalled. One night he ran into his uncle.

“He looked me dead in the face,” he recalled. “And [he] said what are you doing here? I said, the same thing you’re doing here.”

Emily Forman / Side Effects Public Media

Janice McClain climbed aboard the van at a stop in downtown Indianapolis and took a seat among a dozen or so other travelers on a recent September day. They were all women and were all on their way to visit children, spouses and fiancés in prison.

‘Bureaucratic Ninjas’ Slice Red-Tape To Battle Health Disparities

Aug 7, 2017
Kristian Foden-Vencil / Oregon Public Broadcasting

When a receptionist hands out a form to fill out at a doctor’s office, the questions are usually about medical issues: What’s the visit for? Are you allergic to anything? Up to date on vaccines?

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Terrell Harris spent two years in prison on a drug charge when his son was a toddler.

Now, he worries about the effects of that absence.

“I’ve noticed a change in my son because of me not being there and being incarcerated,” Harris says.

Aric Hartvig / WFYI

Twice a month, Ilene Loper gets up at five in the morning and takes three buses for at least an hour each way to get groceries from the St. Vincent De Paul food pantry on East 30th Street.  Even if she could afford to shop there, she lives more than two miles away from the nearest supermarket.

There's more grim news about inequality in America.

New research documents significant disparities in the life spans of Americans depending on where they live. And those gaps appear to be widening, according to the research.

Daniel Schwen, CC, via Wikimedia Commons

In Indianapolis, wealth determines health. If you live in a low-income neighborhood in our city, there's a good chance you’ll die earlier - 14 years earlier, in fact in some neighborhoods.

Jake Harper / Side Effects

When someone dies unexpectedly outside of a hospital in Marion County, Alfarena Ballew, chief deputy coroner, gets a call.

The High Price of Inequality

Oct 26, 2016
Brian Paul/WFYI News

In the poorest neighborhoods in Indianapolis, people live sicker, shorter lives. What would it take to narrow the health gap?