HIV/AIDs

photo courtesy of Johns Hopkins University

The National Institutes of Health announced Monday the launch of a large scale clinical trial that will expand efforts to give more HIV positive transplant candidates new kidneys. The new study will track 160 kidney transplants.

David Kidd / Flickr

While drug-related deaths continue to rise throughout Indiana, one county saw a decrease in drug fatalities in 2017.


ChiLam Ly / https://www.flickr.com/photos/28391140@N03/

The federal government has awarded the state a record-breaking $26 million to help treat patients with HIV. The Indiana State Department of Health says it’s the largest award for HIV services in the state’s history.


Welcome To The Summer Camp For Kids Affected By HIV

Jul 28, 2017
Peter Balonon-Rosen / Indiana Public Broadcasting

It’s a sleep away camp. It’s free. And once a summer the Jameson Camp in Indianapolis hosts a session for campers with this in common: Either they or a family member have HIV/AIDS.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/prep/

The Affordable Care Act did a lot to expand HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention for people at highest risk for the disease. Many gay men and other men who have sex with men gained health insurance and new infections went down. The estimated number of annual HIV infections in the United States declined 18 percent among gay and bisexual men between 2008 and 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Less than a quarter of teens have been tested for HIV, according to new research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  


High out-of-pocket costs may prove to be an insurmountable obstacle for patients seeking medical marijuana. While the treatment has been legalized, the state has not set a price for it, and insurance companies will not be covering it.

As a result, people like Angel won't have access.

"My story is a long story."

What Have We Learned From The Indiana HIV Outbreak?

Oct 2, 2015
Scott County public health nurse Brittany Combs distributes clean syringes from the back of a van in June 2015
Seth Herald

When an outbreak of HIV among injection drug users was declared in rural Scott County, Indiana, in February, it made national headlines. HIV was supposed to be an urban problem, and AIDS had been in steady decline among IV drug users since the early 90s. 

Daniel Raymond, policy director at the national Harm Reduction Coalition, says the Scott County outbreak, which infected 181 people, was a “wake up call” for communities around the country who are dealing with rising rates of hepatitis C, ongoing prescription opioid addiction, and increasing abuse of heroin.

A Milestone In The Campaign To Reduce The Number Of Deaths From AIDS

Oct 1, 2015

The world's annual death toll from AIDS has been falling in recent years — 1.5 million in 2013, a 35 percent drop from the peak of 2.4 million in 2005.

Now the number of deaths could soon drop even more.

The World Health Organization issued new guidelines Wednesday that recommend greatly increasing the number of people who take antiretroviral medications for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection.

“The vagina is cleaner than your mouth,” declared Sharon Hillier, addressing a group of journalists at the HIV Research for Prevention conference in Cape Town last fall. The audience squirmed, gasped and giggled.

The professor of obstetrics-gynecology and reproductive services at the University of Pittsburgh is known for her unabashed statements: She introduces herself as a vaginal ecologist and calls the vagina a “beautiful ecosystem.”

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