lead exposure

cf9b8430-d6ca-497f-92e3-2dfa4c8323a7
courtesy Andy Whelton

That white plume also became a focus of the research. Whelton and his team visited several sites and placed air quality monitors in and around the chemical clouds to capture samples of emissions that the professor now definitively says are “not steam.”

Lead Poisoning’s Lifelong Toll Includes Lowering Social Mobility, Researchers Find

Mar 28, 2017
Joseph Choi/via Flickr

Cynthia Brownfield was lucky. When her daughter, then 2 years old, tested for high levels of lead in her blood, she could do something.

Decades After Ban, Lead Paint Lingers

Jul 27, 2016
Ivan Vranić hvranic/via Flickr

In the wake of the Flint water crisis, states are rushing to test for high levels of lead in drinking water. But many are failing to come to grips with a more insidious problem: lingering lead paint in homes and schools.

Officials Ask Flint Residents To Flush Their Pipes

Apr 27, 2016
Running water filling up a bathtub
ALENA NAVARRO- WHYTE / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Starting May first, if you live in Flint, officials with the EPA, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the city want you to flush water through your home or business every day.

They say you should take your water filter off your kitchen tap or flip the lever to bypass the filter, open your cold water taps in your kitchen and your bathtub all the way, and let them run for five minutes. They want you to do that every day for two weeks.

"The Flint water crisis is a story of government failure, intransigence, unpreparedness, delay, inaction, and environmental injustice."

That's how an independent task force opened its final report on the lead-tainted water crisis in Flint.

It concluded that primary responsibility for the crisis in Flint, Mich., lies with a state environmental agency called the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality — though it said others are also to blame.

Baltimore Struggles To Protect Children From Lead Paint

Mar 22, 2016

When a doctor found that Kenicer Carty's 1-year-old daughter had a dangerously high level of lead last year, it triggered an alarm of sorts. Officials sent an inspector to Carty's 1930 row house in northeast Baltimore. It turned out that every single window had hazardous chipping lead paint.

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder: 'We All Failed The Families Of Flint'

Mar 18, 2016

"Let me be blunt," Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder said in his opening statement to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. "This was a failure of government at all levels. Local, state and federal officials — we all failed the families of Flint."

Feds Approve Medicaid Expansion In Flint To Assist With City's Water Crisis

Mar 8, 2016
A nurse takes a sample of a child's blood to test it for lead.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 The federal government has approved Michigan’s request to expand Medicaid eligibility in Flint. 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says pregnant women and people under 21 in Flint are now eligible for the expanded coverage.

The Snyder administration asked the federal government for the expanded Medicaid coverage, as part of its response to the Flint water crisis. There are concerns about the health effects of exposure to Flint’s lead-tainted drinking water. 

The expansion will affect an estimated 15,000 Flint residents.

Flint, Mich., isn't the only American city with a lead problem. Though the health crisis in Flint has highlighted the use of lead in water pipes, author David Rosner tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that lead, which is a neurotoxin, can be found throughout the U.S. on walls, in soil and in the air.

"The problem with lead is that it's now really everywhere, and we've created a terribly toxic environment in all sorts of ways," he says.

In an Ohio Town, Officials Waited Months to Disclose Dangerous Lead Levels

Feb 1, 2016
Massive shipments of bottled water in a warehouse.
Julie Grant / The Allegheny Front

At the community center in tiny Sebring, Ohio, it’s clear there’s something going on. There are trucks from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. People are wearing official-looking fluorescent yellow jackets. The Red Cross is here. And residents are picking up bottled water.

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