medication-assisted treatment

Joe Flintham/via Flickr

A much-anticipated new study found two popular opioid addiction medications are equally effective after treatment begins.

A shortages of qualified treatment providers is frequently cited as an obstacle in fighting the opioid addiction crisis. Yet, according to research published in the journal PLoS One, the solution may lie in the hands of primary care providers who can successfully treat addiction.

Jake Harper / Side Effects Public Media

Philip Kirby says he first used heroin during a stint in a halfway house a few years ago, when he was 21 years old. He quickly formed a habit.

"You can't really dabble in it," he says.

  

Indiana will cover methadone for the first time under its Medicaid programs beginning August 1. The state will also add five new opioid treatment programs (OTPs) across the state to help combat the ongoing drug abuse epidemic.

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Vermont Sees 'Significant Shift' Toward Treating Addiction In A Doctor's Office

Jun 15, 2016
James Rebinskas
Lynn McCrea / Vermont Public Radio

Opiate addiction and how best to treat it continues to be a focus in Vermont. And that includes the question of where to provide medication-assisted treatment.

Often, people are seen in one of Vermont’s five main treatment centers, or "hubs." But lately, physicians are being encouraged to see such patients in their own local practices.

An injection is administered to the upper arm.
Blake Patterson via Flickr

Although they can manage drug addictions behind bars, inmates are at a high risk for overdosing and reoffending in their first year once released.

That's why Pennsylvania's Department of Corrections will be one of the first in the nation to begin treating opiate-addicted inmates with medication.