mental illness

Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

DeVonte Jones began to show signs of schizophrenia as a teenager. His first public episode was nine years ago at a ball game at Wavering Park in Quincy, Illinois.

“He snapped out and just went around and started kicking people,” said Jones’ mother Linda Colon, who now lives in Midlothian in the Chicago suburbs.


Clinics Help Keep People With Serious Mental Illness Out Of ER

Nov 22, 2016
Bahram Mark Sobhani/for KHN

SAN ANTONIO— Yolanda Solar has battled a life-threatening disease for more than three decades.

The disease nearly killed her last summer, and Solar, a 73-year-old grandmother, was rushed to the hospital by ambulance.

A 12-year-old boy named Strazh hangs from the monkey bars, staring at the ground. The other kids in the park in San Francisco aren't interested in him. And he's not interested in them.

"I just like to play by myself," he says.

Strazh has autism. Today is a good day. But on most others, Strazh has meltdowns. Something frustrates him and he can't control his emotions.

"I sometimes end up screaming," he says. "And I end up yelling and screaming."

At the center of Geel, a charming Belgian town less than an hour's drive from of Antwerp, is a church dedicated to Dymphna, a saint believed to have the power to cure mental disorders. It's a medieval church with stone arches, spires and a half-built bell tower, and it has inspired an unusual centuries-old practice: For over 700 years, residents of Geel have been accepting people with mental disorders, often very severe mental disorders, into their homes and caring for them.

To Lower Suicide Rates, Connecting With Men Is Key

Apr 11, 2016
"Dr. Mahogany" gestures toward a red phone in his office.
mantherapy.org

Dr. Rich Mahogany's therapy office would fit well in a hunting lodge: dark wood desk, dark-paneled walls with a moose head, a dartboard, old books, old lamps. He looks just like Ron Swanson on the TV series "Parks and Recreation."

This story was produced by WHYY's The Pulse

"Did you know that men have feelings too?" he asks on his YouTube channel. "Not just the hippies, all of us. Hello, I'm Dr. Rich Mahogany, welcome to Man Therapy."

Saving Amanda: One Family’s Struggle To Deal With A Daughter’s Mental Illness

Mar 15, 2016
Pam Lipp hugging her daughter Amanda. Both are smiling at the camera.
Heidi De Marco / KHN

In March 2010, Pam Lipp received the call she’d been dreading for months. She figured it would come from one of three places: the police, the hospital or the morgue. Instead, it was her husband, Doug, saying that he’d just received word that their 18-year-old daughter, Amanda, a freshman at Chico State University in California, was being held at a psychiatric crisis center after trying to throw herself in front of a moving car. Amanda had lost her grip on reality and fallen into a state of psychosis. She’d started selling off her belongings and believed that cameras were following her everywhere.

Part Support Group, Part Job Training Program, Clubhouses Help Mentally Ill Re-Enter Workforce

Mar 10, 2016
Member Ricky Edwards at work at Central Indiana Clubhouse.
Jill Sheridan / IPBS News

A community center serving those with severe mental illness in Indianapolis is working to regain state Medicaid funding in order to help community members connect to services and get jobs.

Circle City Clubhouse, (formerly called Central Indiana Clubhouse) serves about 80 people with mental illness on the west side of Indianapolis.


Tammy Strobel via Flickr

A village of tiny homes to house people with mental illnesses could be coming to Chatham County, North Carolina.

Many people with mental illnesses live on a federal income of about $750 per month, called the Supplemental Security Income, which creates a challenge for them to find safe and affordable housing.

This story was produced by WUNC

A Doctor’s Role In Stopping Human Trafficking In Texas

Feb 7, 2016
COM SALUD via Flickr

Texas is an epicenter for human trafficking. Recently, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton established a new unit of attorneys and investigators focused on combating human trafficking. Each year, thousands of adults and children are trafficked through the state and many end up living in cities like Dallas and Houston. It turns out some victims are walking into hospitals, and some doctors believe these visits are a window of opportunity to help them escape.

Mental Health Courts Are Popular But Effectiveness Is Still Unproven

Dec 28, 2015
Eric E. Johnson via Flickr

Mental health courts are popular in many communities, and it’s easy to understand why. Rather than sending someone who’s mentally ill to an overcrowded jail that is poorly equipped to manage his condition, mental health courts offer treatment and help with housing and other social services. The community saves on the cost of locking someone up and offenders get support to stay healthy and may have their charges expunged. Everybody wins, right?

This story was originally produced by Kaiser Health News

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