obamacare exchange

It's time to start shopping for health insurance if you're one of the millions who buys it on an Affordable Care Act exchange.

Open enrollment for 2018 starts Wednesday, and new numbers released by the Trump Administration show that the average cost of a benchmark policy will be about 27 percent higher next year.

But that's just the headline. The details suggest there's good news for lots of people who are willing to shop around a bit for insurance.

Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET

President Trump's decision Thursday to end subsidy payments to health insurance companies is expected to raise premiums for middle-class families and cost the federal government hundreds of billions of dollars.

The White House announced late Thursday night the federal government will no longer provide cost sharing reductions for Affordable Care Act insurance plans. Indiana insurers — at least the two still left on the exchange — had been bracing for the news.


Trump Executive Order Chips Away At Obamacare, Hopes To Expand Insurance Options

Oct 12, 2017

Note: This story was updated at 11:28 a.m. ET to reflect additional information from administration officials.

Paul Sableman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pasa/

The Trump Administration said this week it was cutting additional funding support for Affordable Care Act enrollment initiatives. Officials said it was because the services had served their purposes, but detractors saw it as a blatant attempt to sabotage Obamacare.

Earlier this summer, President Donald Trump urged an audience at the White House to "let Obamacare fail" as it became clear the Republican overhaul of the far-reaching health care act was unlikely to succeed. 

Updated 4:21 p.m. ET Aug. 1

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., announced today that the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee will hold bipartisan hearings on ways to stabilize the Affordable Care Act marketplaces for 2018.

The hearings will start the week of Sept. 4. Their aim is to act by Sept. 27, when insurers must sign contracts to sell individual insurance plans on HealthCare.gov for 2018.

Sarah Fentem / Side Effects Public Media

Two of the four insurers currently offering plans on Indiana’s Affordable Care Act health insurance marketplace announced Wednesday they were pulling their plans next year, citing uncertainty surrounding the future of Obamacare and volatility in the market.

Only two health insurers will offer plans next year on Indiana’s Affordable Care Act exchange, according to proposed rate increases posted by the Indiana Department of Insurance posted Thursday. That’s down from four insurers this year and seven in 2016.