telemedicine

Emily Forman / WFYI

When President Trump declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency in late October, it triggered a regulatory change intended to make it easier for people to get care in places with provider shortages. This declaration allows for the prescribing  of addiction medicine virtually, without doctors ever seeing the patient in person. (The regulatory change is not fully implemented until the DEA issues further rules.)

 


Telemedicine's Next Frontier: Birth Control

Aug 29, 2017
Courtesy Nurx

Telemedicine, the medical practice in which doctors remotely diagnose illnesses and prescribe medication through phone calls or video conferencing, has for years been used to treat illnesses ranging from strep throat to ear infections.

Southern, Midwestern States Tackle A Severe Doctor Shortage

Jun 16, 2016
The first class of medical students gathered last week to mark the opening of a branch of the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine on the campus of Arkansas State University in Jonesboro. Starting new branches of medical school
Arkansas State University

Earlier this month, dignitaries gathered at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro to cut the ribbon on a new medical school, only the second in a state with a dire shortage of doctors.

Rise Of Medical Power Couples Makes It Harder To Recruit Doctors To Rural Areas

Mar 2, 2016
Bobby Troup and Julie London played opposite each other as doctor and nurse in the 1970s TV program "Emergency!".
NBC Television via Flickr

If someone is well-educated, the odds are that he or she will marry someone with similar credentials, according to census data. And that trend has consequences when it comes to access to health care in rural areas.

Rural areas have for years been facing a doctor shortage. That means for the roughly 20 percent of Americans who live in those areas, it’s harder to get care when it’s needed. Policymakers have been trying to create programs that offer medical debt forgiveness and other incentives to doctors willing to set up shop away from the city. But a research letter published Tuesday in JAMA highlights how a key demographic change — the rise of power couples — is stacking the deck against these efforts.

 

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

When children get sick at school, it can be a big disruption. For the kids – they have to miss class –and for mom or dad, who have to leave work, try and schedule a last minute doctor’s appointment, maybe even go to the emergency room. So, what if kids could see a pediatrician without having to leave school? 


Who Pays For Telehealth?

Jan 8, 2016

With just a few clicks of the mouse, Orlando mom Alyssa Grimes visits with a pediatrician from the comfort of her living room. She logs into a Skype-like application on her laptop, where she virtually meets her child's doctor based across town at Nemours Children's Hospital.

Jay Reed via Flickr

A recent study by the Missouri Telehealth Network shows both patients and providers are satisfied with the quality of care telemedicine provides. Telemedicine allows a patient to speak to a provider via a video call, and has been an option for Missourians for the past 21 years and . 

Ninety percent of patients and providers surveyed in the study were satisfied with the quality of care received via telemedicine.

Got Credit / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Faced with a computer program, adults with depression were generally "unwilling to engage" in a recent British study. Depressed patients preferred to interact with human beings.

But, WBUR's Common Health reports, there's still a place for technology in mental health care. Video conference sessions with therapists, for example, or using computer programs as a complement to live interaction.

Telephone Therapy Helps Older People In Rural Areas, Study Finds

Aug 6, 2015
CC0 Public Domain

Therapy provided over the phone lowered symptoms of anxiety and depression among older adults in rural areas with a lack of mental health services, a new study shows.

The option is important, one expert said, because seniors often have increased need for treatment as they cope with the effects of disease and the emotional tolls of aging and loss.

This story was originally published by Kaiser Health News. 

Michael McFadden

Six-year old Jason Green squirms in a dental chair at a clinic in Sodus, New York while a hygienist probes his mouth with an unusual instrument. It looks like an electric toothbrush, but it is a camera and it’s capturing images that allow Jason’s dentist to inspect his teeth in detail--from 30 miles away. The dentist, Dr. Sean McClaren, practices at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, NY, but he sees several patients a week in this rural community, via a secure internet connection and a video call.

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