trauma

Would Indiana Hospitals Be Ready For A Las Vegas-Style Mass Shooting?

Oct 3, 2017

Indiana has at least a dozen trauma hospitals which could respond in the event of a mass shooting like the one in Las Vegas Sunday night. But those campuses have varying capabilities.

Only three hospitals are rated as “trauma one”– the highest rating, with doctors specializing in certain types of surgery that may be required after a severe wound.

Texas Lawmaker Wants Truck Drivers To Help Combat Human Trafficking

Nov 15, 2016
Todd Lappin/via Flickr

This week is the first one when members of the Texas Legislature can introduce legislation for the new session and State Sen. Sylvia Garcia has introduced a bill to require that applicants for commercial driver licenses take a course on identifying and reporting human trafficking.

 


Andrea Muraskin/Side Effects

It’s not something you expect to see in a courtroom: 35 women, chatting, laughing, eating lasagna. But brunch before the session is a weekly tradition at an unusual court in Columbus, Ohio.

Once the plates are cleared away and everyone sits down in a semi-circle facing the bench, a probation officer steps to the center of the room, with an empty plastic bin and a big smile.

“You know I love you so much, right?” she says, as she collects everyone’s cell phones, to a chorus of groans.

With focus groups, researcher looks at race, trauma and mental health in north St. Louis

May 3, 2016

New insight from a Washington University study could improve access to mental health care for African-American men. 

Michelle Faust

Excited and hungry, three children chant as food is served (“We want potatoes! Potatoes!) and ask what else is for dinner (fish and green beans as it happens). The hubbub continues until Mom cracks down:

“Please! Sit. On your bottom.” The children obey. They continue to buzz as they eat.

MDMA, often known as Ecstasy or Molly, has for decades been used as a party drug — consumed in clubs, fuel for all-night raves. But lately, the substance is also being used in very different settings, for a very different purpose: to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

Emily Roth sits in a café after a long weekend shift. The 27-year old obstetrics nurse eats a sandwich and gushes about her 15-month old daughter. Her smile puffs her cheeks up, lifting her brown rectangular-framed glasses away from her face.

Roth has been a nurse for three years and she loves her job, but she hasn’t always felt that way. "I was going home pretty stressed out on a regular basis. I would go home and cry to my husband sometimes," she said.

It's just the crumb of a muffin, but Martha Galvis must pick it up. Lips clenched, eyes narrowed, she pushes it back and forth across a slick table, then in circles.

"I struggle and struggle until," Galvis pauses, concentrating all her attention on the thumb and middle finger of her left hand. She can't get them to close around the crumb.

"I try as much as I can, and if I do it, I'm so happy — so happy," she says, giggling.

Son and mother featured in the story
Alex Smith / KCUR

It’s always a struggle to resettle in a new country, but for Bhutanese refugees, the challenge has been especially difficult. Bhutan, a largely Buddhist country, is known for having created a ‘national happiness index,’ but it has also forced out many of its ethnically Nepali, mostly Hindu, population. Since arriving in the United States, many of these refugees have suffered serious mental health issues.

When you ask people what impacts health you'll get a lot of different answers: Access to good health care and preventative services, personal behavior, exposure to germs or pollution and stress. But if you dig a little deeper you'll find a clear dividing line, and it boils down to one word: money.

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