Addiction

Medical Responses To Opioid Addiction Vary By State, Analysis Find

Jun 13, 2017

Location, location, location. That mantra may apply even when it comes to how opioid addiction is treated.

Opioids are flowing into Ohio in a way that would be familiar to anyone who’s shopped online: People are placing orders on the internet, and having packages of fentanyl delivered to their doors.

FDA Requests Drug That Helped Spark HIV Outbreak Be Pulled

Jun 9, 2017
Tom Walker / http://bit.ly/2sbumGv

For the first time ever, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is asking a pharmaceutical company to remove an opioid from the market due to the dangers of abuse. The drug is linked to Indiana’s HIV outbreak.

It's a heartbreaking piece of arithmetic: In Massachusetts, the numbers of slots in inpatient psychiatric treatment centers just don't line up with the amount of people who need help. Where do would-be patients go in the meantime?

As Opioids Mix, More Naloxone Needed To Stop Overdoses

May 31, 2017
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ADAPT Pharma / narcan.com

The overdose reversal drug naloxone is in high demand across Indiana. But the state is now seeing more mixes of opioids causing overdoses. That’s leading first responders to go through their supplies more quickly.

Overdoses caused by multiple types of opioids require larger or repeated doses of naloxone.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

More than half of people say they've suffered lower back pain in the past year, according to the latest NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll.

That's not a surprise; low back pain is very common, and one of the biggest reasons that people seek medical care. But people told us that they're making very different choices in how they treat that pain, with some stark differences among age groups and income levels.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Addiction experts are up in arms following remarks from Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, in which he referred to medication-assisted treatment for addiction as “substituting one opioid for another.”

Ed Murray / http://murray.seattle.gov

Fueled by research conducted on such sites in other countries, the Massachusetts Medical Society's delegates voted to support studying a pilot program creating  a so-called "supervised injection facility," or SIF, in the commonwealth. 

Safe injection sites are designated areas where drug users can shoot up drugs under supervision of medical professionals, who can then intervene in the case of an overdose. They also provide clean needles and other supplies. If an SIF came to Boston, it would be the first safe injection space in the country. 

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