Policy and Politics

Indiana Seeks Three-Year Renewal Of Medicaid Expansion Program

Feb 1, 2017
Drew Tarvin/via Flickr

Indiana announced it wants the federal government to renew HIP 2.0, the state’s Medicaid expansion program, for three years.

Jake Harper/Side Effects

Indiana’s new governor, Eric Holcomb, vowed to tackle the state’s drug addiction epidemic in his first State of the State address on Tuesday. But he has also said he supports Congress’s plans to repeal and replace Obamacare.

Bjoertvedt / Wikimedia Commons

Updated January 13, 4:12pm

Congress took steps this week toward repealing the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare, by passing a budget resolution that allows Republicans to get rid of the law without the threat of filibuster. This could affect millions of Americans who gained coverage through Medicaid expansion, including about 250,000 Hoosiers.

Jake Harper / Side Effects

If she’s confirmed, Indiana policy consultant Seema Verma will start work as Donald Trump’s pick to lead the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. She’ll bring her experience designing Indiana’s unique Medicaid expansion to the national policy conversation.

Brandon Smith/IPBS

Indiana governor Mike Pence is in the spotlight this week as the man Donald Trump has chosen as his running mate. His decisions about health and healthcare in Indiana have drawn attention from within and outside the state. And his record could be important in November, because his running mate doesn’t have a legislative record at all.

House Speaker Paul Ryan
Gage Skidmore via Flickr

With eight months left in President Obama's term, House Republicans may have finally struck a blow against his signature health care law. 

At issue are the subsidies that the federal government pays to insurance companies to bring down out-of-pocket costs for individuals and families who earn between 100 and 250 percent of the federal poverty level. House Republicans filed the suit, contending that the subsidies are unconstitutional because the President authorized the spending without the approval of Congress. Over $175 billion has been spent so far. 

Is Indiana’s Alternative Medicaid Expansion Working?

Mar 25, 2016
Reginald Rogers in a dental office
Phil Galewitz / KHN

Reginald Rogers of Gary, Indiana owes his dentist a debt of gratitude for his new dentures, but no money.

Indiana’s Medicaid program has them covered, a godsend for the almost toothless former steelworker who hasn’t held a steady job for years and lives in his daughter’s basement. “I just need to get my smile back,” Rogers, 59, told his dentist at a clinic here recently. “I can’t get a job unless I can smile.”

Rebecca Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

With just a little over a month left in the third open enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act, some people may need a little additional help getting insurance through the ACA.

Health insurance can be a confusing topic, with its array of terminology and choices to puzzle through, from premiums and co-pays, to deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums.

A national survey by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that more than 70 percent of people surveyed after the last open enrollment period said they wanted one-on-one assistance enrolling in insurance coverage.

And people can find the help they seek in an unexpected place: their public library. While libraries are better known for books, story time and due dates – since the launch of the ACA, many libraries across the United States have embraced a new role as a go-to community resource for information on health insurance.


Rebecca Smith / Side Effects Public Media

When the University of Missouri temporarily canceled graduate student health insurance subsidies earlier this month, it highlighted a troublesome unintended consequence of the Affordable Care Act that may affect universities around the country.


Mark Fisher/CC

The Affordable Care Act passed its second major test before the Supreme Court Thursday. In King v. Burwell the Supreme Court upheld a key measure of the Affordable Care Act, ruling that federal health insurance subsidies should be allowed in all states,  regardless of whether the state has created its own insurance exchange or relies on the federal governments'.

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