PTSD and Childhood Trauma

Are Traumatized Students Disabled? A Debate Straight Outta Compton

Aug 20, 2015

An unprecedented, class action lawsuit brought against one Southern California school district and its top officials could have a big impact on schools across the country.

On Thursday in Los Angeles, a U.S. District Court judge will preside over the first hearing in the suit against the Compton Unified School District. To understand the complaint, you need to understand Compton.

It's not easy for a child who has had mental health issues to make a successful transition into adulthood. But even children who have symptoms that are mild enough that they wouldn't be diagnosed are more likely to struggle with life as adults, a study finds.

Cruelty of Teen Bullying Feeds Into Adult Depression

Jun 5, 2015
Two teen girls talking taunting another teen girl
zalouk webdesign/CC via Wikimedia Commons

If you’ve ever sat in a therapist’s chair wondering if those bullies from junior high are responsible for your adult depression, a study published earlier this week in the British Medical Journal lends weight to your theory.

This article was originally published by Pro Publica.

When 17-year-old Lexie Grüber first entered the Allison Gill Lodge group home for girls in Manchester, Connecticut, she said it felt less like a home than a business. Instead of family photos, the walls were covered in informational posters and licensing certificates. When her emotions got the better of her, she said, the only conversations she had were with a doctor with a prescription pad at the ready.

Now 22 and a recent college graduate, Grüber came before the Senate Finance Committee this week to testify about the experience. She recalled being medicated to the point that she developed a facial tic. She said she lost basic privileges like phone calls and television time for what she now considers normal teenage behavior. 

Beverly and Pack via Flickr/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The rate of suicide among military personnel has more than doubled since 2005.  A study released earlier this month in the medical journal JAMA Psychiatry found no connection between suicide and deployment.

The study looked at military members who served during the latest conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Researchers found elevated rates of suicide among veterans with fewer than four years of service, and among those who received other-than-honorable discharges.

It's just the crumb of a muffin, but Martha Galvis must pick it up. Lips clenched, eyes narrowed, she pushes it back and forth across a slick table, then in circles.

"I struggle and struggle until," Galvis pauses, concentrating all her attention on the thumb and middle finger of her left hand. She can't get them to close around the crumb.

"I try as much as I can, and if I do it, I'm so happy — so happy," she says, giggling.

When Emelin was 13, she asked the mayor of her rural Guatemalan town to find ways to help girls stay in school and get better health care. He laughed out loud. "You are wasting my time; you should go home," he told Emelin and her friend Elba, who had come with her.

The University of Florida's Dr. Nancy Hardt has an unusual double specialty: She's both a pathologist and an OB-GYN. For the first half of her career, she brought babies into the world. Then she switched — to doing autopsies on people after they die.

It makes perfect sense to her.

"Birth, and death. It's the life course," Hardt explains.

Son and mother featured in the story
Alex Smith / KCUR

It’s always a struggle to resettle in a new country, but for Bhutanese refugees, the challenge has been especially difficult. Bhutan, a largely Buddhist country, is known for having created a ‘national happiness index,’ but it has also forced out many of its ethnically Nepali, mostly Hindu, population. Since arriving in the United States, many of these refugees have suffered serious mental health issues.

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