Research

Ted Knudsen / Flickr

Researchers from the Indiana Hemophilia & Thrombosis Center (IHTC) and Northwestern University say a genetic mutation in some Old Order Amish living in Indiana protects them from effects of aging.

Debunking The Communion Cup Myth

Nov 17, 2017
fcor1614 / Flickr

Pastor Matt Doan of Calvary Church Santa Ana, in Southern California, pours grape juice into individual plastic cups, each about half the size of a shot glass. He fits them into deep silver trays, in preparation for the next day’s Communion.


Joe Flintham/via Flickr

A much-anticipated new study found two popular opioid addiction medications are equally effective after treatment begins.

Doctors, Researchers And Parents At Odds Over ‘Safe’ Sleep

Nov 14, 2017
Barbara Brosher / WTIU News

The Indiana Department of Child Services says asphyxiation was the leading cause of child neglect deaths in fiscal year 2015. And, according to DCS data, nearly a quarter of those incidents were the result of parents failing to provide safe sleeping environments.

It's a Sunday morning at the Abyssinian Baptist Church, a famous African-American church in the Harlem area of New York City. The organist plays as hundreds of worshippers stream into the pews. The Rev. Calvin O. Butts III steps to the pulpit.

"Now may we stand for our call to worship," says Butts, as he begins a powerful three-hour service filed with music, dancing, prayers and preaching. "How good and pleasant it is when all of God's children get together."

Navigating The Realities Of Relapse And Recovery

Oct 16, 2017
Kimberley Paynter / WHYY/The Pulse

For decades, prevailing wisdom held that to overcome addiction, the most important thing to do was to flush or “clean” the drugs out of one’s system, to get a fresh start. But more and more, research into the brain, in particular, has largely found this notion to be a myth. After all, long after those chemicals are gone, the underlying addiction and the cravings are still there.


The Cycle of Opioids Addiction

Sep 19, 2017

Sound Medicine begins the new year with the return of a special program exploring the medical community’s growing awareness of opioid abuse and addiction, and the devastating consequences of prescribing opioids for pain. In this special program, we hear from expert physicians and former prescription pain addicts to explore how our use of opioids to treat pain has led to opioid abuse, and hundreds of thousands of deaths.

One of those patients, Karen, shares her story of addiction with Sound Medicine host Barbara Lewis. 

Guests include: 

It's always appealing to think that there could be an easy technical fix for a complicated and serious problem.

For example, wouldn't it be great to have a vaccine to prevent addiction?

"One of the things they're actually working on is a vaccine for addiction, which is an incredibly exciting prospect," said Dr. Tom Price, secretary of Health and Human Services.

Lag In Brain Donation Hampers Understanding Of Dementia In Blacks

Aug 9, 2017
Anna Gorman / Kaiser Health News

The question came as a shock to Dorothy Reeves: Would she be willing to donate her husband’s brain for research?

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