Karen Shakerdge

Push To Take End-Of-Life Forms Digital Reveals Complicated Path Ahead

Dennis Rodgers flips over a bright pink piece of paper and rattles off his choices: “Attempt resuscitation or do not attempt resuscitation... to do limited intervention or to take no medical intervention… whether to intubate or not to intubate.” Rodgers, 82, says he and his physician filled out the form together when he moved to a community outside of Rochester, N.Y. For years physicians in New York state have asked seriously sick patients to fill out this paper document, capturing their...
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Jake Harper/Side Effects

Margarita came to Indianapolis 13 years ago to help her sister, who had been diagnosed with brain cancer. After her sister died, Margarita stayed, but then a few years ago, she began having health problems of her own. When she went to the hospital, she was told that her kidneys didn’t work anymore.

ThorPorre/via WikiMedia Commons

This week - You would be forgiven if you forgot your end-of-life paperwork in an emergency, soon NY'ers might not have to remember it. ... First responders struggle to keep up with opioid overdoses in Ohio. ... That new Zika money that Congress finally passed, what will it go to? ... And, take a deep breath, stress could undo all that healthy eating. ... These and more ...

Rebecca Smith / KBIA/Side Effects

As of the September 30, a relatively unknown herbal supplement called kratom will likely join the ranks of Schedule 1 drugs in the U.S. - alongside drugs like heroin, LSD and marijuana.

This supplement has been traditionally used in Southeast Asia, but has recently gained popularity in the United States as a way to manage opioid withdrawal or chronic pain without the use of prescription medications.

Researchers and people using the herb decry the DEA’s move to criminalize it, which they say will stall research and deprive many Americans of a presumably harmless substitute to stronger prescription painkillers.


Karen Shakerdge

Dennis Rodgers flips over a bright pink piece of paper and rattles off his choices:  “Attempt resuscitation or do not attempt resuscitation... to do limited intervention or to take no medical intervention… whether to intubate or not to intubate.”

Eating well has many known benefits. But a good diet may not be able to counteract all the ill effects of stress on our bodies.

A new study, published in Molecular Psychiatry, suggests stress can override the benefits of making better food choices.

Increase In Youth Suicide Prompts States To Act

Sep 28, 2016
Stathis Stavrianos/via Flickr

SALT LAKE CITY — When J.D. Goates was 17 and newly graduated from high school, he decided that he had had enough.

Jake Harper/Side Effects

Jamie Landrum has been a police officer for two years in District 3 on the west side of the Cincinnati. In late August, the city was hit by 174 overdoses in six days. Landrum says officers were scarce.


It’s In The Water: The Debate Over Fluoridation Lives On

Sep 27, 2016
Steve Johnson/via Flickr

Many people take for granted the addition of fluoride into public drinking water systems that aims to prevent tooth decay. It’s a seven-decade-old public health effort. But it’s not nearly as universally accepted as one might think.

Karthikeyan K/via Flickr

This week - That weight-loss tracker on your wrist sure makes you look fitter, but it might not work. ... An EpiPen two-pack costs $69 to make and Mylan sells it for $600, so why is its CEO saying the device isn't as profitable as everyone thinks? ... A cardiologist converts to veganism, and he's telling patients if it's right for them. ... These and more ...

Tobacco Tax Ballot Measure Would Fund Health Care For Poor — But How?

Sep 23, 2016
Kazukichi/via Flickr

At first blush, the tobacco tax measure on California’s November ballot looks pretty straightforward.

Proposition 56 would raise the price of a pack of cigarettes by $2 and tax e-cigarettes for the first time. Proponents say the higher price would prevent kids from smoking and lower health care spending because people won’t suffer as much from tobacco-related illness.

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