Monash University/via Flickr

Teaching Future Doctors About Addiction

Jonathan Goodman can recall most of the lectures he’s attended at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He can recite detailed instructions given more than a year ago about how to conduct a physical. But at the end of his second year, the 27-year-old M.D.-Ph.D. student could not remember any class dedicated to addiction medicine.
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Karen Shakerdge

This week: It's not eggs that are making you sick if you eat raw cookie dough, at least lately -- it's flour. HOW many calories are in that beer? And a dying man's last wish to donate his organs leads to a fight. These and more ...

Teaching Future Doctors About Addiction

19 hours ago
Monash University/via Flickr

Jonathan Goodman can recall most of the lectures he’s attended at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He can recite detailed instructions given more than a year ago about how to conduct a physical.

But at the end of his second year, the 27-year-old M.D.-Ph.D. student could not remember any class dedicated to addiction medicine. 

There's been a looming fear that mosquitoes would start spreading the Zika virus in the U.S. Now that possibility seems increasingly real.

On Thursday, senior officials at the Food and Drug Administration said they have asked blood donation centers in two Florida counties, Miami-Dade and Broward, to stop collecting blood for the time being.

Prisons To Expand Opioid Addiction Treatment

Jul 27, 2016
Photo by Rhode Island Executive Office of Health and Human Services

Rhode Island’s prison system is offering drug treatment to more inmates. Until now, only inmates who entered prison on medication for opioid addiction were allowed to continue that medication. And only for 60 days. Now, the Adult Correctional Institutions will continue medication for six months or longer, thanks to an infusion of cash in this year’s state budget. 

Decades After Ban, Lead Paint Lingers

Jul 27, 2016
Ivan Vranić hvranic/via Flickr

In the wake of the Flint water crisis, states are rushing to test for high levels of lead in drinking water. But many are failing to come to grips with a more insidious problem: lingering lead paint in homes and schools.

A 12-year-old boy named Strazh hangs from the monkey bars, staring at the ground. The other kids in the park in San Francisco aren't interested in him. And he's not interested in them.

"I just like to play by myself," he says.

Strazh has autism. Today is a good day. But on most others, Strazh has meltdowns. Something frustrates him and he can't control his emotions.

"I sometimes end up screaming," he says. "And I end up yelling and screaming."

Too Much Sun? A Full-Body Visual Check For Skin Cancer Might Not Be For You

Jul 26, 2016
Luke Lehrfeld/via Flickr

For years, many dermatologists have urged patients to have a full-body visual check for skin cancer. But a new report by a panel of medical experts concluded for the second time in seven years that there is not enough evidence that these screenings benefit patients to recommend them as a preventive service.

Karen Shakerdge

At 44-years-old Dave Adox was facing the end of his two year battle with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. He needed a ventilator to breathe and couldn’t move any part of his body, except his eyes. Once he started to struggle with his eyes – his only way to communicate – Adox decided it was time to die.

He wanted to donate his organs, to give other people a chance for a longer life. To do this, he’d need to go off his breathing support in a hospital.

    

How A Caribbean Island Became Prime Source Of U.S. Zika Cases

Jul 25, 2016
Ronald Saunders/via Flickr

More than 1,400 Americans contracted Zika while traveling outside the U.S. this year and a Caribbean-island nation is one of the top destinations where they caught the virus.

Visitors to the Dominican Republic account for more than a fifth of the confirmed Zika cases in the U.S. through mid-July, according to data from state health departments. New York, Florida and California alone tally 304 cases linked to the country, the data show.

Will Heat Waves Cause More Deaths As The Climate Warms?

Jul 25, 2016
Karen Montgomery/via Flickr

In June, a heat wave in the American southwest sent the mercury soaring over 115 degrees in parts of Arizona. At least four deaths were linked to that heat wave.

Considering that 2016 is predicted to be the hottest year on record worldwide, and that last month was declared the hottest June on record in the United States, how could climate change influence the number of heat-related deaths we see?

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