Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

With Work Requirement, Indiana’s Medicaid Would Be More Expensive And Cover Fewer People

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

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On Wednesday, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, or CBO, released an updated report outlining potential effects of the updated GOP Obamacare "repeal and replace" bill, known as the American Health Care Act. The findings indicate that over the next ten years, 23 million Americans would lose insurance under the AHCA.

That's one million fewer than the projection for the first version of the AHCA, which failed in the U.S House in March. 

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City announced on Wednesday that it will not offer individual plans on the Affordable Care Act insurance exchanges next year The move will affect about 67,000 people across 30 counties in Missouri and two counties in Kansas

“Through 2016 we have lost more than  $100 million [on ACA plans],” the company’s CEO Danette Wilson said in a release. “This is unsustainable for our company.”


In a week when federal health policy is dominating the headlines, Indiana is also looking to make some unusual changes to its Medicaid program.

GOP Health Plan Would Leave 23 Million More Uninsured, Budget Office Says

May 24, 2017

The revised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will leave 23 million more people uninsured in 2026 than if that act, also known as Obamacare, were to remain in place. The GOP bill would also reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years.

This story was updated on May 24 to clarify include new information on proposed cuts to Medicaid.

The proposed budget unveiled Tuesday by the Trump administration doubles down on major cuts to biomedical research; programs to fight infectious disease outbreaks; health care for the poor, elderly and disabled; and prevention of HIV/AIDS.

As Kansas Foster Care System Sets Records, Advocates Call For More Family Services

May 22, 2017
Meg Wingerter / Kansas News Service

Editor’s note: Kansas privatized its foster care system in 1997 after a lawsuit revealed widespread problems. Twenty years later, the number of Kansas children in foster care has shot up — by a third in just the last five years — and lawmakers are debating whether the system once again needs serious changes. 

Republicans Race The Clock On Health Care — But The Calendar Is Not Helping

May 22, 2017
Kaiser Health News

Back in January, Republicans boasted they would deliver a “repeal and replace” bill for the Affordable Care Act to President Donald Trump’s desk by the end of the month.

In the interim, that bravado has faded as their efforts stalled and they found out how complicated undoing a major law can be. With summer just around the corner, and most of official Washington swept up in scandals surrounding Trump, the health overhaul delays are starting to back up the rest of the 2018 agenda.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

 Planned Parenthood wants a court to halt portions of a new Indiana abortion law. It’s the fifth lawsuit over abortion legislation in seven years.

More than half of people say they've suffered lower back pain in the past year, according to the latest NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll.

That's not a surprise; low back pain is very common, and one of the biggest reasons that people seek medical care. But people told us that they're making very different choices in how they treat that pain, with some stark differences among age groups and income levels.

Racial And Ethnic Disparities Persist In Sudden Infant Deaths

May 17, 2017

American Indian and Alaska Native families are much more likely to have an infant die suddenly and unexpectedly, and that risk has remained higher than in other ethnic groups since public health efforts were launched to prevent sudden infant death syndrome in the 1990s. African-American babies also face a higher risk, a study finds.

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