Can Triage Nurses Help Prevent 911 Overload?

Most people are familiar with some form of triage: When you go to an emergency room, you first sit down with a triage nurse who records your symptoms, takes your vital signs and assesses the urgency of your medical need. As of Thursday, that's happening over the phone for 911 callers in Washington, D.C. , where triage nurses now sit alongside 911 dispatchers to help field calls. Why are they there? D.C. has the highest rate of 911 calls in the U.S., and 1 in 4 of those calls is not an actual...

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On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

On The Front Lines Of A Drug Crisis: A New Video Series

The opioid addiction crisis is often reported on in desperate terms. But, to the people working on the frontlines of the problem, there are known and proven approaches that can help.

In E.B. White's classic children's story Stuart Little, the eponymous mouse lives happily with a New York City family.

But Dr. Ian Lipkin wanted to know whether cohabiting with a mouse may be hazardous to one's health.

So Lipkin and his colleagues at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health spent a year collecting mice from throughout New York City to see whether they carry any dangerous germs.

Barbara Bush’s End-Of-Life Decision Stirs Debate Over ‘Comfort Care’

Apr 17, 2018
Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

[UPDATED at 9:45 p.m. ET on April 17]

Former first lady Barbara Bush died Tuesday night at her home in Houston at age 92. Days before her death, the announcement that she was seeking “comfort care” shone a light — and stirred debate — on what it means to stop trying to fight terminal illness.

There's an irony at the heart of the treatment of high blood pressure. The malady itself often has no symptoms, yet the medicines to treat it — and to prevent a stroke or heart attack later — can make people feel crummy.

"It's not that you don't want to take it, because you know it's going to help you. But it's the getting used to it," says Sharon Fulson, a customer service representative from Nashville, Tenn., who is trying to monitor and control her hypertension.

FDA Launches Criminal Investigation Into Unauthorized Herpes Vaccine Research

Apr 12, 2018
Al Drago/CQ Roll Call

The Food and Drug Administration has launched a criminal investigation into research by a Southern Illinois University professor who injected people with his unauthorized herpes vaccine, Kaiser Health News has learned.

It is so common that it likely will have happened at least once somewhere in the United States by the time you finish reading this sentence. But it took more than 230 years for it to happen to a senator in office.

On Monday, Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., became the first sitting senator to give birth, challenging Senate leaders to face just how ill prepared they may be to accommodate the needs of a new mother.

A big part of Washington D.C.'s plan to get its HIV rate down is to get more uninfected people on PrEP, a two-medicine combination pill that's also sold under the brand name Truvada.

Report: Hoosier Health May Be Impacted By Climate Change

Apr 10, 2018
Pixabay

The health of Hoosiers may be impacted as the climate continues to change, according to a new report that examines how environmental trends, including continued warming, could impact health statewide.

By the time Ann Marie Owen, 61, turned to marijuana to treat her pain, she was struggling to walk and talk. She was also hallucinating.

For four years, her doctor prescribed a wide range of opioids for transverse myelitis, a debilitating disease that caused pain, muscle weakness and paralysis.

The drugs not only failed to ease her symptoms, they hooked her.

When her home state of New York legalized marijuana for the treatment of select medical ailments, Owens decided it was time to swap pills for pot. But her doctors refused to help.

Atlanta Struggles To Fulfill MLK's Legacy In Health Care

Apr 4, 2018

While public safety commissioner Bull Connor's police dogs in 1963 attacked civil rights protesters in Birmingham, Ala., leaders in Martin Luther King Jr.'s hometown of Atlanta were burnishing its reputation as "the city too busy to hate."

Yet 50 years after the civil rights leader was killed, some public health leaders in Atlanta wonder whether the city is failing to live up to King's call for justice in health care. They point to substantial disparities, particularly in preventive care.

Losing your nest egg is apparently hazardous to your health — very hazardous.

An analysis involving more than 8,000 Americans found that those who suffered a "negative wealth shock" — defined as losing at least 75 percent of their wealth in two years — faced a 50 percent increased risk of dying over the next two decades.

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What's Your Health care Workaround Story?

What's Your Health care Workaround Story?

What is the craziest thing you've had to do to get the health care you need? We're launching a new podcast called "The Workaround", and we're looking for your stories!

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