President Barak Obama announces his intention to seek funding from Congress for precision medicine at the State of the Union Address on January 30, 2015
The White House

“Precision Medicine Is Not Public Health”: An Interview With A Precision Medicine Skeptic

Precision medicine has a lot of important people in government excited. It’s a relatively new model of healthcare in which physicians use information about a patient’s particular genetic makeup to help prevent, diagnose or treat a disease. In January 2015, President Obama asked Congress for $215 million to fund the Precision Medicine Initiative, which aims to collect the DNA of 1 million Americans. The head of the National Institutes of Health has made precision medicine a priority and the...
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President Barak Obama announces his intention to seek funding from Congress for precision medicine at the State of the Union Address on January 30, 2015
The White House

Precision medicine has a lot of important people in government excited. It’s a relatively new model of healthcare in which physicians use information about a patient’s particular genetic makeup to help prevent, diagnose or treat a disease.  In January 2015, President Obama asked Congress for $215 million to fund the Precision Medicine Initiative, which aims to collect the DNA of 1 million Americans.

By the time DeAngelo Cortijo was 14, he had been in more than a dozen foster homes. He had run away and lived on the streets for months, and he had been diagnosed with bipolar and anxiety disorders, attachment disorder, intermittent explosive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder. He had been in and out of mental hospitals and heavily medicated.

Cortijo, who was born in San Francisco, was taken from his mother after she attempted suicide when he was 3.

David Sanford, CEO of Wichita-based GraceMed, says health centers that serve Kansans who lack insurance or have trouble paying for health care are seeing growing demand for their services.
Bryan Thompson / Heartland Health Monitor

Health centers that serve Kansans who lack insurance or struggle to pay for primary health care are seeing no lack of demand for their services.

Rebecca Lewis of McPherson, a small town in the center of the state, was once a part of that group. In 2011, Lewis found herself working three part-time jobs and trying to complete a college degree. As a single mom with three young boys — then ages 8, 5 and 2 — it was hard to make ends meet.

Psychologist Melinda Ginne, 65, at her house in Oakland, California on May 26, 2015.
Heide de Marco / Kaiser Health News

After the state of California fined her employer $4 million in 2013 for violating the legal rights of mental health patients, Oakland psychologist Melinda Ginne expected her job — and her patients’ lives — to get better.

Instead, she said, things got worse.

Women and health advocates held a rally at the Capitol to urge approval of a program that provides IUDs and long-acting birth control devices to young women
Katie Kerwin McCrimmon / Health News Colorado

A Colorado birth control program that has cut unintended pregnancies and abortions by nearly half since 2009 will stay alive for at least one more year thanks to $2 million in donations from private foundations.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

When 85-year-old retired farmworker and grandmother Amparo Mejia needed surgery on her spine because of a rare form of tuberculosis, she was able to pay for the procedure through emergency Medicaid. She was lucky. For many low-income immigrants – even those authorized to work in the US – it can be challenging or outright impossible to get health insurance. 

 

Becky Smith/Side Effects Public Media

A round-up of public health news from around the nation

New Research Could Make it Possible to Test Suicide Risk in the Lab

Could a genetic test save someone from taking their own life? Side Effects reporter Jake Harper reports on encouraging new research.

Rebecca Smith / Side Effects Public Media

When the University of Missouri temporarily canceled graduate student health insurance subsidies earlier this month, it highlighted a troublesome unintended consequence of the Affordable Care Act that may affect universities around the country.

With gun violence heavily in the news lately, there have been calls for scientists to study issues surrounding gun safety and the causes of gun violence. But as the Takeaway reports, a little-known law prohibits one of the nation's largest research funders--the Centers for Disease Control--from supporting this kind of research.

Agrilife Today via Flickr/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

Time is running out for late taxpayers who want to keep their subsidies next year. 

Technically, the health insurance subsidies available to most Americans who aren't offered plans by their employers are tax credits. If you enter your income into Healthcare.gov, it spits out an amount that you can chose to apply to a monthly premium, or deduct from your taxes when you file.  Either way,  you must file an income tax return, including a new form detailing your monthly premium and subsidy.

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