Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

With Work Requirement, Indiana’s Medicaid Would Be More Expensive And Cover Fewer People

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

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Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

This week, Missouri transferred the state-run health coverage of about 240,000 low-income adults and children to managed care plans run by three companies: WellCare, Centene Corporation and United Health Group.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Addiction experts are up in arms following remarks from Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, in which he referred to medication-assisted treatment for addiction as “substituting one opioid for another.”

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ranks Indiana among the states with the highest rates of hepatitis C infection, a virus that destroys the liver and leads to liver cancer. Indiana's rate is double the national average with 2 per 100,000 people affected. These people recently tested for and were diagnosed with hepatitis C.

ISDH Launches County Profiles To Fight Opioid Epidemic

May 15, 2017

A new tool from the Indiana State Department of Health aims to help counties determine how best to respond to the opioid epidemic. Those profiles, released Monday, offer a view of how the opioid epidemic is impacting Indiana communities, county by county.

ISDH deputy commissioner Pam Pontones says the information is not meant to rank counties or serve as a comparison but rather to give counties a snapshot of their risks and trends.

Focus On Infants During Childbirth Leaves U.S. Moms In Danger

May 12, 2017

As a neonatal intensive care nurse, Lauren Bloomstein had been taking care of other people's babies for years. Finally, at 33, she was expecting one of her own. The prospect of becoming a mother made her giddy, her husband, Larry, recalled recently— "the happiest and most alive I'd ever seen her."

Lauren Chapman/WFYI

Janaya Wilkins, 25, dropped out of high school when she was a teenager. She has tried and failed to get her GED twice since then.

Now, Wilkins, a mother of two is giving high school another shot in her hometown of Indianapolis.  

And she’s getting help sticking to her goals from a life coach, whose services are paid for by an unexpected source, her health insurance company.

When the Republican healthcare plan was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives last week, an amendment that could impact people with pre-existing conditions drew strong reactions. Advocacy groups for domestic violence survivors were among the first to speak up.

Training services manager with the Domestic Violence Network, Mary Margret Sweeny says she is concerned about some of the language in the American Health Care Act.

Rory MacLeod / https://www.flickr.com/photos/macrj/

On Sunday, Marian University in Indianapolis graduated its first-ever medical school class, handing out 133 Doctor of Osteopathy degrees. Next weekend, 331 Indiana University School of Medicine grads will collect their diplomas.

Federal lawmakers are moving ahead with a new approach to health care that includes changing the way insurers cover pre-existing health conditions.

There's more grim news about inequality in America.

New research documents significant disparities in the life spans of Americans depending on where they live. And those gaps appear to be widening, according to the research.

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