abortion laws

If High Court Reverses Roe v. Wade, 22 States Likely To Ban Abortion

Jul 11, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

What would the U.S. look like without Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case that legalized abortion nationwide?

That’s the question now that President Donald Trump has chosen conservative Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Debate over reproductive rights heats up again in Missouri

Jul 10, 2018
Creative Commons/Pixabay

President Donald Trump’s newest nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court simply adds to the latest round of heightened political tensions in Missouri over reproductive rights and abortion.

And, as expected, it’s already become a key issue in the state’s closely watched U.S. Senate race. Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is making the Supreme Court confirmation the centerpiece of the Republican U.S. Senate candidate’s first TV ad, which began airing Monday.

Daniel Lobo / Flickr

As tensions over abortion access increase across Indiana and nationwide, a new report shows the number of Hoosier women who had abortions increased for the first time in five years.

Judge Halts Indiana's Latest Anti-Abortion Law

Jun 30, 2018
Lauren Chapman/IPB News

A federal judge says Indiana’s latest anti-abortion law is likely too vague to enforce.

The judge Thursday temporarily halted the state’s new abortion complication reporting law from taking effect.

The abortion rate in the United States fell to its lowest level since the historic Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision legalized abortion nationwide, a new report finds.

The report by the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports legalized abortion, puts the rate at 14.6 abortions per 1,000 women of childbearing age (ages 15-44) in 2014. That's the lowest recorded rate since the Roe decision in 1973. The abortion rate has been declining for decades — down from a peak of 29.3 in 1980 and 1981.

The former site of a Planned Parenthood clinic in Terre Haute, Ind.
Paul Sableman via Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Abortion rates are on the decline across the country.

An Associated Press survey this week revealed abortion rates on average dropped 12 percent nationally.

In Indiana the decline was even more dramatic.

In 2010, the state saw 10,031 abortions, according to the Indiana State Department of Health. In 2013, the year with the most recent data, there were 8,027. That’s a 20 percent decline.

Telemedicine For Abortion Comes Before The Supreme Court

May 21, 2015
pregnancy test positive result
By Klaus Hoffmeier [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The House of Representatives’ approval last week of a bill to ban abortions after 20 weeks brings into sharp focus the issue of early access to abortion.  Abortion rights supporters say more than a dozen states have banned one option that could improve early access: telemedicine.

Of the million or so women who have abortions every year in the U.S., nearly a quarter end their pregnancy using medications. But just as states have been passing a record number of restrictions on surgical abortion, more are trying to limit this option as well.

One of the country's strictest laws is in Ohio. To understand it, a little history helps.

This week, Congress returns with House leaders vowing to revisit the anti-abortion bill they pulled off the floor last week. The ban on abortions after 20 weeks was withdrawn when it appeared there weren't enough Republican votes to pass it.

Why did it need quite so many Republican votes? Because the GOP can no longer count on a contingent of Democrats to help out on abortion-related votes.

A U.S. appeals court on Wednesday is scheduled to hear arguments on the constitutionality of a hotly contested abortion law in Texas. The measure mandates stricter building codes for clinics that perform the procedure, and Fifth Circuit judges in New Orleans will decide whether that poses an undue burden.

The Texas law — HB2 — requires clinics that perform abortions to operate like ambulatory surgical centers. Think wider hallways and hospital-style equipment — upgrades that could cost millions.

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