Community-based mental health

Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

DeVonte Jones began to show signs of schizophrenia as a teenager. His first public episode was nine years ago at a ball game at Wavering Park in Quincy, Illinois.

“He snapped out and just went around and started kicking people,” said Jones’ mother Linda Colon, who now lives in Midlothian in the Chicago suburbs.


Busting Myths About Mental Illness

Jul 11, 2016
Heidi de Marco/KHN

When Annie Powell, 35, was in the midst of a 72-hour manic episode in February 2013, she felt like Superwoman: productive and energetic. “I went to the gym for a 5:30 a.m. class, worked all day, came home and went to the gym again with my family. Then, I stayed up all night and organized my office, worked more, cleaned the house and did laundry,” says Annie.

But once the 72 hours ended, she crashed and fell into a deep depression. “I sat in the basement and stared at the wall for hours,” says Annie.

The rise in opioid drug abuse and gun violence have led to recent calls to overhaul the nation’s mental health care system. But a law passed by the U.S. Congress in 2014 is already driving a big new experiment in mental health care.  

Inside this unmarked door in lower Manhattan, an experiment is being conducted. People with serious mental illness come to Parachute NYC respite centers to escape pressures in their lives that could lead to a crisis. In most cases, they get the soft landi
Sean Sime Photography / Stateline

NEW YORK – It is a busy Friday afternoon. Staff members check in guests at the front desk. Other employees lead visitors on tours of the upstairs bedrooms, or field calls from people considering future stays. Aromas of garlic and roasted chicken seep out of the kitchen.