incarceration

http://www.msh.state.ms.us/

The state of mental health care in Mississippi has been in freefall for years.

As a consequence of the ripple effects of the financial crisis, Mississippi saw its state support for mental health care slashed by $42 million from 2009 to 2011, roughly 15 percent of the Department of Mental Health’s budget.

Jill Sheridan / Indiana Public Broadcasting/IPB News

Indiana has the second-highest rate of parental incarceration in the nation. In 2015, nearly 11 percent of Indiana children had a parent who was — or had been — jailed.


Emily Forman / Side Effects Public Media

Janice McClain climbed aboard the van at a stop in downtown Indianapolis and took a seat among a dozen or so other travelers on a recent September day. They were all women and were all on their way to visit children, spouses and fiancés in prison.


Allison Greene / Indiana Womens' Prison

A pregnant woman in prison typically has 48 hours with her baby after it’s born before it’s taken away: an intensely painful experience for the mother and child alike that additionally has the potential to damage the baby’s development. 


Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Terrell Harris spent two years in prison on a drug charge when his son was a toddler.

Now, he worries about the effects of that absence.

“I’ve noticed a change in my son because of me not being there and being incarcerated,” Harris says.

Prisons And Jails Forcing Inmates To Cover Some Medical Care Costs

Sep 29, 2015
tOrange.us

Correctional facilities are responsible for providing health services to people who are jailed, but that doesn’t mean that prisoners don’t face financial charges for care. In most states they may be on the hook for copayments ranging from a few dollars to as much as $100 for medical care, according to a recent study.