Supreme Court

Weighing The Legal Odds Of The Latest ACA Challenge

Mar 5, 2018
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Indiana’s Attorney General Curtis Hill has joined 19 other states in a legal challenge against the Affordable Care Act. Experts say some parts of the argument may be more legally effective than others.


Repeal Obamacare / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nobamanomas/

Indiana’s Attorney General Curtis Hill is one of 20 state officials lobbing a new attack at the Affordable Care Act.

If successful, the lawsuit could mean the end of federal support for Indiana’s Medicaid expansion, which is funded through the Affordable Care Act.

Supreme Court Strikes Down Key Restrictions In Texas Anti-Abortion Law

Jun 27, 2016
In a 5-3 ruling, the Supreme Court ruled Monday in favor or Whole Woman's Health in their case against Texas health commissioner John Hellerstedt.
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The Supreme Court struck down key aspects of a Texas abortion law Monday, casting doubt on similar laws in nearly two dozen states.

At issue in the court’s decision were two specific provisions of a sweeping law to restrict abortions passed by the Texas legislature in 2013. The provisions before the court required doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital no more than 30 miles from the abortion clinic and required abortion clinics to meet the same health and safety standards as “ambulatory surgical centers” that perform much more complicated procedures.

Supreme Court Tests Texas' New Restrictions On Abortion

Mar 2, 2016

Even with the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, Wednesday could mark a potential turning point for the Supreme Court on the subject of abortion. At issue is whether a new Texas law imposes restrictions that unconstitutionally limit a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy.

Last June, a federal appeals court upheld the law. If the Supreme Court agrees, it would mean a dramatic cutback on abortion rights across the country, and potentially a steppingstone toward the reversal of Roe v. Wade.

2016: A Showdown Year for Reproductive Rights

Jan 13, 2016
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For advocates of women's reproductive rights, 2015 was the definition of "annus horribilis:" marked by tough new limits on abortion, a debilitating Planned Parenthood scandal, and a shooting at a Colorado clinic that left three people dead. For abortion opponents, it was the year when decades of incremental political and legal gains merged into something much bigger. Now 2016 is shaping up to be even more turbulent 2014 perhaps the most momentous year for reproductive issues in a generation.

With yet another do-or-die test of Obamacare before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, the justices were sharply divided.

By the end of the argument, it was clear that the outcome will be determined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy. The chief justice said almost nothing during the argument, and Kennedy sent mixed signals, seeming to give a slight edge to the administration's interpretation of the law.

Judging by the comments from the remaining justices, the challengers would need the votes of both Roberts and Kennedy to win.

Round 2 in the legal battle over Obamacare hits the Supreme Court's intellectual boxing ring Wednesday.

In one corner is the Obama administration, backed by the nation's hospitals, insurance companies, physician associations and other groups like Catholic Charities and the American Cancer Society.

In the other corner are conservative groups, backed by politicians who fought in Congress to prevent the bill from being adopted.

The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court tussled over the meaning of the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act Wednesday. The issue is whether the law allows companies to suspend pregnant workers, while allowing other workers with temporary disabilities to remain on the job.

The Supreme Court has placed a hold on a 2013 Texas law that was threatening to close most of the state's clinics that perform abortions.

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the law was already responsible for the closing of nearly 40 clinics across Texas. Nina filed this report for our Newscast unit: