Health Coverage

Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

On Wednesday, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, or CBO, released an updated report outlining potential effects of the updated GOP Obamacare "repeal and replace" bill, known as the American Health Care Act. The findings indicate that over the next ten years, 23 million Americans would lose insurance under the AHCA.

That's one million fewer than the projection for the first version of the AHCA, which failed in the U.S House in March. 

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City announced on Wednesday that it will not offer individual plans on the Affordable Care Act insurance exchanges next year The move will affect about 67,000 people across 30 counties in Missouri and two counties in Kansas

“Through 2016 we have lost more than  $100 million [on ACA plans],” the company’s CEO Danette Wilson said in a release. “This is unsustainable for our company.”


In a week when federal health policy is dominating the headlines, Indiana is also looking to make some unusual changes to its Medicaid program.

GOP Health Plan Would Leave 23 Million More Uninsured, Budget Office Says

May 24, 2017

The revised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will leave 23 million more people uninsured in 2026 than if that act, also known as Obamacare, were to remain in place. The GOP bill would also reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years.

Republicans Race The Clock On Health Care — But The Calendar Is Not Helping

May 22, 2017
Kaiser Health News

Back in January, Republicans boasted they would deliver a “repeal and replace” bill for the Affordable Care Act to President Donald Trump’s desk by the end of the month.

In the interim, that bravado has faded as their efforts stalled and they found out how complicated undoing a major law can be. With summer just around the corner, and most of official Washington swept up in scandals surrounding Trump, the health overhaul delays are starting to back up the rest of the 2018 agenda.

Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

This week, Missouri transferred the state-run health coverage of about 240,000 low-income adults and children to managed care plans run by three companies: WellCare, Centene Corporation and United Health Group.

Lauren Chapman/WFYI

Janaya Wilkins, 25, dropped out of high school when she was a teenager. She has tried and failed to get her GED twice since then.

Now, Wilkins, a mother of two is giving high school another shot in her hometown of Indianapolis.  

And she’s getting help sticking to her goals from a life coach, whose services are paid for by an unexpected source, her health insurance company.

Indiana has submitted new information to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on its Medicaid expansion program, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0. 

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