Health Inequities & Gaps in Care

Can Comfort Care At The ER Help Older People Live Longer And Suffer Less?

May 26, 2017

A man sobbed in a New York emergency room. His elderly wife, who suffered from advanced dementia, had just had a breathing tube stuck down her throat. He knew she never would have wanted that. Now he had to decide whether to reverse the life-sustaining treatment that medics had begun.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/prep/

The Affordable Care Act did a lot to expand HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention for people at highest risk for the disease. Many gay men and other men who have sex with men gained health insurance and new infections went down. The estimated number of annual HIV infections in the United States declined 18 percent among gay and bisexual men between 2008 and 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

 Planned Parenthood wants a court to halt portions of a new Indiana abortion law. It’s the fifth lawsuit over abortion legislation in seven years.

When the Republican healthcare plan was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives last week, an amendment that could impact people with pre-existing conditions drew strong reactions. Advocacy groups for domestic violence survivors were among the first to speak up.

Training services manager with the Domestic Violence Network, Mary Margret Sweeny says she is concerned about some of the language in the American Health Care Act.

Federal lawmakers are moving ahead with a new approach to health care that includes changing the way insurers cover pre-existing health conditions.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

When Joe Morris had a heart attack last Easter and had to be rushed to the ER, it was the first time he’d been to the doctor in more than 40 years — since high school.

Back home in the small community of Neosho, Mo., Morris needed follow-up care to manage his heart disease and diabetes, but he didn’t have a doctor — or insurance.


How Disease Rates Vary By State — And What States Can Do About It

Dec 13, 2016
Chris Bentley/via Flickr

By many measures, Hawaii is one of the healthiest states in the union. Yet only Mississippi has a higher rate of flu or pneumonia deaths than the Aloha State.

West Virginia, which is usually among the bottom dwellers in state health rankings, is in the middle of the pack when it comes to deaths related to Alzheimer’s disease.

Hospital Companions Can Ease Isolation For Older People

Nov 21, 2016

Loneliness can be a problem for older people, especially when they're in the hospital. Their children may have moved away. Spouses and friends may themselves be too frail to visit. So a California hospital is providing volunteer companions in the geriatric unit.

One of the volunteers at the UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica is 24-year-old Julia Torrano. She hopes to go to medical school. Meanwhile, her twice-weekly volunteer shifts give her a lot of practice working with patients.

For Immigrant Families, Mix Of Status And Low Income Makes Staying Healthy A Struggle

Jul 9, 2016
Mary Wiltenburg / For KHN

Some days, in the busy East Baltimore insurance agency where she works, saleswoman Nathaly Uribe takes nonstop calls from members of the city’s Latino community, looking to buy home and car protection plans. It’s an unspoken irony that the women in her office, who spend eight hours a day insuring others, don’t have health insurance themselves.

In 2014, the percentage of construction workers with health insurance increases from 64 to almost 69.
Jon Fleshman via Flickr / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Immigrants saw the steepest gains in health insurance coverage in 2014, the first year for enrollment on the Affordable Care Act's exchanges and Medicaid's expansion, according to a New York Times analysis of census data. Hispanics accounted for nearly one third of the increase in adults with insurance. A smaller percentage of blacks gained coverage, according to the Times, because most poor blacks live in states that chose not to expand Medicaid. 

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