Immigrant Health Care

Jake Harper / Side Effects Public Media

One patient's death changed the course of Dr. Lilia Cervantes' career. The patient, Cervantes says, was a woman from Mexico with kidney failure who repeatedly visited the emergency room for more than three years. In that time, her heart had stopped more than once, and her ribs were fractured from CPR. The woman finally decided to stop treatment because the stress was too much for her and her two young children. Cervantes says she died soon after.

Casa De Salud / https://www.facebook.com/casadesalud/

Several parts of the country have only a quarter or less than the mental health professionals they need, according to the federal Health Resources and Services Administration. That means it can take months to receive treatment.

Understanding The History Behind Communities' Vaccine Fears

May 5, 2017

All four of Anab Gulaid's children have received their vaccinations on the recommended schedule. As Somali-American residents of Minneapolis, that puts them in the minority.

Fewer than half of Minnesota children of Somali descent have received the MMR shot that protects against measles, mumps and rubella, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Health, which is now working to combat a growing measles outbreak in the Twin Cities.

When You Don’t Speak The Same Language As Your Child’s Doctor

Feb 27, 2017
Ana B. Ibarra/California Healthline

When Margarita Ruiz takes her children to the doctor’s office, she has no choice but to trust that nurses and front desk staff are translating medical orders accurately. She doesn’t speak English and her children’s pediatrician speaks very little Spanish.

For Immigrant Families, Mix Of Status And Low Income Makes Staying Healthy A Struggle

Jul 9, 2016
Mary Wiltenburg / For KHN

Some days, in the busy East Baltimore insurance agency where she works, saleswoman Nathaly Uribe takes nonstop calls from members of the city’s Latino community, looking to buy home and car protection plans. It’s an unspoken irony that the women in her office, who spend eight hours a day insuring others, don’t have health insurance themselves.

When The Cost Of Care Triggers A Medical Deportation

Apr 13, 2016

In an emergency, hospitals, by law, must treat any patient in the U.S. until he or she is stabilized, regardless of the patient's immigration status or ability to pay.

Yet, when it comes time for the hospitals to discharge these patients, the same standard doesn't apply.

Though hospitals are legally obligated to find suitable places to discharge patients (for example, to their homes, rehabilitation facilities or nursing homes), their insurance status makes all the difference.

Why A US Health Clinic Suggests Cambodian Treatments For Everyday Maladies

Mar 16, 2016
Women gather to meditate at the Metta Health Center in Lowell MA.
Heidi Shin / PRI

Doctors at a health clinic in Lowell, Massachusetts, had a problem — their exam rooms reminded refugee patients of torture chambers. The stethoscopes, the blood pressure cuff squeezing your arm — they looked like the torture devices used on their families, during Cambodia’s genocide.


Martin Machain has his eyes examined in a doctor's office.
Sonia Narang

When Martin Machain arrived to Los Angeles from Mexico years ago, he didn’t know where to turn for health care. Machain migrated to the US to escape poverty and change his life. But without insurance, it hasn’t been easy.


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