Policy and Politics

Jake Harper / Side Effects

Indiana has submitted a proposal to the federal government to to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program, the Healthy Indiana Plan 2.0. But the state skirted an important step in the approval process: seeking public comment from Indiana residents.

Former Patients Wary As Republicans Tout Risk Pools In New Health Plan

Jun 5, 2017
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

Nine years ago, Missouri resident Barb Fleming had built a small business selling tableware and wedding gifts. But that career nearly came crashing down around her when her doctor found a lump in her breast in 2008.

GOP Health Bill Pleases Most Republicans, But Not Many Other Americans

Jun 2, 2017
Kaiser Family Foundation

The health overhaul bill passed by the House earlier this month accomplishes one major feat: It is even less popular than the not-very-popular Affordable Care Act it would largely replace, a new poll finds.

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Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

On Wednesday, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, or CBO, released an updated report outlining potential effects of the updated GOP Obamacare "repeal and replace" bill, known as the American Health Care Act. The findings indicate that over the next ten years, 23 million Americans would lose insurance under the AHCA.

That's one million fewer than the projection for the first version of the AHCA, which failed in the U.S House in March. 

In a week when federal health policy is dominating the headlines, Indiana is also looking to make some unusual changes to its Medicaid program.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/prep/

The Affordable Care Act did a lot to expand HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention for people at highest risk for the disease. Many gay men and other men who have sex with men gained health insurance and new infections went down. The estimated number of annual HIV infections in the United States declined 18 percent among gay and bisexual men between 2008 and 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

GOP Health Plan Would Leave 23 Million More Uninsured, Budget Office Says

May 24, 2017

The revised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will leave 23 million more people uninsured in 2026 than if that act, also known as Obamacare, were to remain in place. The GOP bill would also reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years.

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