Policy and Politics

On Wednesday, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, or CBO, released an updated report outlining potential effects of the updated GOP Obamacare "repeal and replace" bill, known as the American Health Care Act. The findings indicate that over the next ten years, 23 million Americans would lose insurance under the AHCA.

That's one million fewer than the projection for the first version of the AHCA, which failed in the U.S House in March. 

In a week when federal health policy is dominating the headlines, Indiana is also looking to make some unusual changes to its Medicaid program.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/prep/

The Affordable Care Act did a lot to expand HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention for people at highest risk for the disease. Many gay men and other men who have sex with men gained health insurance and new infections went down. The estimated number of annual HIV infections in the United States declined 18 percent among gay and bisexual men between 2008 and 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

GOP Health Plan Would Leave 23 Million More Uninsured, Budget Office Says

May 24, 2017

The revised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will leave 23 million more people uninsured in 2026 than if that act, also known as Obamacare, were to remain in place. The GOP bill would also reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years.

This story was updated on May 24 to clarify include new information on proposed cuts to Medicaid.

The proposed budget unveiled Tuesday by the Trump administration doubles down on major cuts to biomedical research; programs to fight infectious disease outbreaks; health care for the poor, elderly and disabled; and prevention of HIV/AIDS.

Republicans Race The Clock On Health Care — But The Calendar Is Not Helping

May 22, 2017
Kaiser Health News

Back in January, Republicans boasted they would deliver a “repeal and replace” bill for the Affordable Care Act to President Donald Trump’s desk by the end of the month.

In the interim, that bravado has faded as their efforts stalled and they found out how complicated undoing a major law can be. With summer just around the corner, and most of official Washington swept up in scandals surrounding Trump, the health overhaul delays are starting to back up the rest of the 2018 agenda.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

 Planned Parenthood wants a court to halt portions of a new Indiana abortion law. It’s the fifth lawsuit over abortion legislation in seven years.

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